the BBS Xchange
the BBS Xchange

  • SyncTerm on Linux - HOWTO Install

    From Doubleman@VERT to All on Tue Apr 3 15:22:01 2012
    Hello all.

    How does one install SyncTerm on Linux? I got the cryptlib file, and am unable to make the file. I followed instructions, but came up short. It says on the screen:

    make: -c: Command not found

    Please help!?

    -_Doubleman

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Vertrauen ■ Home of Synchronet ■ telnet://vert.synchro.net
  • From Deuce@VERT/SYNCNIX to Doubleman on Wed Apr 4 12:15:55 2012
    Re: SyncTerm on Linux - HOWTO Install
    By: Doubleman to All on Tue Apr 03 2012 03:22 pm

    How does one install SyncTerm on Linux? I got the cryptlib file, and am unable to make the file. I followed instructions, but came up short. It
    says on the screen:

    I would need a bit more information regarding which instructions you followed, and what you were doing.

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  • From Purple Nurple@VERT/SHENKS to Doubleman on Thu Apr 5 10:53:00 2012

    Hello all.

    How does one install SyncTerm on Linux? I got the cryptlib file, and am unab to make the file. I followed instructions, but came up short. It says on the screen:

    make: -c: Command not found

    Please help!?

    It's difficult to tell from your message, but are you trying to build
    SyncTerm from source? If so, perhaps GNU make (and probably the compiler, requisite libraries, headers, etc.) have not yet been installed on your machine?

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ SHENK'S EXPRESS, Virginia Beach, VA, shenks.synchro.net
  • From Generalram@VERT/NORMAD to Purple Nurple on Tue Apr 17 00:08:43 2012

    Hello all.

    How does one install SyncTerm on Linux? I got the cryptlib file, and am unab to make the file. I followed instructions, but came up short. It says on the screen:

    make: -c: Command not found

    Please help!?

    It's difficult to tell from your message, but are you trying to build SyncTerm from source? If so, perhaps GNU make (and probably the compiler, requisite libraries, headers, etc.) have not yet been installed on your machine?


    Use make instead of gmake.

    sudo apt-get install g++
    sudo atp-get install cvs
    sudo apt-get install gcc

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  • From Generalram@VERT/NORMAD to Doubleman on Tue Apr 17 23:47:51 2012
    Hello all.

    How does one install SyncTerm on Linux? I got the cryptlib file, and am unable to make the file. I followed instructions, but came up short. It
    says on the screen:

    make: -c: Command not found

    Please help!?

    -_Doubleman



    Try this:

    sudo apt-get update
    sudo apt-get install gcc
    sudo apt-get install g++
    sudo apt-get install cvs

    You need the development tools installed or else you need to reinstall them or update them.

    This is assuming you have apt installed on your Linux system and it is Debian or Ubuntu based. A big bug in the Debian and Ubuntu distros cause this error and you have to reinstall the development tools to fix it via apt. Other distros try reinstalling with yum or whatever you use.

    Sometimes gcc and g++ are not installed, and cvs is needed when you are
    running the install script to make it easier. Trust me you need cvs for other stuff too. The Wiki is not to clear on that and has a page that lists requirements and most people don't read it because it is a different page and had the requirements been on the main Wiki page it would have been easier to understand.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Normad BBS Telnet bbs.normad.com port 23 for Retrocomputing talk
  • From Chris Perrault@VERT/DMINE to Doubleman on Sat Apr 21 23:24:04 2012
    Re: SyncTerm on Linux - HOWTO Install
    By: Doubleman to All on Tue Apr 03 2012 03:22 pm

    I don't recall having to compile it when I installed it. I think I was able to get a binary and simply installed it to /usr/local/bin (as root) and then remembered to set the permissions and add /usr/local/bin to my users path.
    You may want to check to see if a precompiled binary is available.
    Chris
    /s

    Hello all.

    How does one install SyncTerm on Linux? I got the cryptlib file, and am unab to make the file. I followed instructions, but came up short. It says on the screen:

    make: -c: Command not found

    Please help!?

    -_Doubleman


    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Diamond Mine Online - bbs.dmine.net - Fredericksburg, VA USA
  • From John Guillory@VERT/MAINLINE to Generalram on Sun Apr 22 21:01:56 2012
    Re: Re: SyncTerm on Linux - HOWTO
    By: Generalram to Purple Nurple on Tue Apr 17 2012 12:08 am

    Hello all.

    How does one install SyncTerm on Linux? I got the cryptlib file, and a unab to make the file. I followed instructions, but came up short. It says on the screen:

    make: -c: Command not found

    Use make instead of gmake.

    sudo apt-get install g++
    sudo atp-get install cvs
    sudo apt-get install gcc

    Just for the record after installing sbbs on Debian (I think 6?) on kingcoder.net,
    I have a few comments to the above, as they're pretty much the same as suggested
    for Debian installs...

    you realise like many, you transposedthe t and p on the cvs line....
    I believe it was mentioned I needed gmake for sbbs, and the library was
    make. I retrieved it, no luck. I tried going to gnu's site and downloading
    it and installing it manually... Everything worked, but there was still no
    "gmake" command. I checked the output of the compiled sources and found
    it made a 'make' not 'gmake', so I used 'make' instead of gmake. It worked.
    good luck on finding g++ if it's not a part of your standard installation!
    g++ isn't found as a package name on most distributions.
    syncterm will likely need ncurses and sdl libraries... Probably console
    tools as well...


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  • From Chris Trainor@VERT/FLEETHQ to John Guillory on Wed Apr 25 18:54:20 2012
    Re: Re: SyncTerm on Linux - HOWTO
    By: John Guillory to Generalram on Sun Apr 22 2012 21:01:56

    I believe it was mentioned I needed gmake for sbbs, and the library was
    make. I retrieved it, no luck. I tried going to gnu's site and download
    "gmake" command. I checked the output of the compiled sources and found
    it made a 'make' not 'gmake', so I used 'make' instead of gmake. It work

    I thought they mentiond in the docs it may be 'make' on same machines.
    All depends on the Linux flavor. Running SBBS on Linux is still kindof
    a 'trick' generally left to developers or experienced Linux S/A's. The Windows install is much easier for those who aren't really fluent with
    Linux.

    good luck on finding g++ if it's not a part of your standard installation
    g++ isn't found as a package name on most distributions.

    I don't know of any real Linux distro that doesn't have G++. That's GNU
    C++. If your Linux Distro doesn't do the GNU bit, then whatever their
    C++ complier is will do. Most distro's will pull in the needed stuff to
    build all of SBBS if you choose their 'development environment' setting
    during install.

    syncterm will likely need ncurses and sdl libraries... Probably console
    tools as well...

    curses will be needed, but I don't think you'll need SDL unless you're
    running XWindows. Tho you may need the dev libraries if you want to
    compile it on a box that doesn't have X on it (it wont run obviously if
    you don't have X, but some folks like to keep their dev build boxes
    separate from their desktops).

    --Chris

    ---------------------------------
    Chris Trainor - FleetHQ BBS
    telnet://bbs.fleethq.org

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ FleetHQ BBS - Greenville, RI
  • From John Guillory@VERT/MAINLINE to Chris Trainor on Thu Apr 26 11:36:09 2012
    Re: Re: SyncTerm on Linux - HOWTO
    By: Chris Trainor to John Guillory on Wed Apr 25 2012 06:54 pm

    I thought they mentiond in the docs it may be 'make' on same machines.
    All depends on the Linux flavor. Running SBBS on Linux is still kindof
    a 'trick' generally left to developers or experienced Linux S/A's. The Windows install is much easier for those who aren't really fluent with Linux.
    Hmmm, I played with linux before the kernel hit 1.0.0, but don't stay
    up to date on every flavor of linux, and all the updates. Anyone that
    tries to claim they know all the distrobutions and are up to date on
    everything is either fooling their self or lieing through their teeth.
    Every day they're coming up with a new linux distribution for different
    architectures. Keeping up is next to impossible. New packages added
    every day... I wished in a way that folks would maintain compatibility
    as much as possible with packages... eg. The make/gmake. On my system,
    I installed gnu make, and it reads gnumake files, but the command is still
    called make. Kind of confusing, but if your going to change the name to
    make it more convient, include a symbolic link named 'gmake' to point to
    make... It'd help for those of us that didn't quite understand some of
    those hidden messages... ;-) And when a package won't install on a
    particular distribution (Libra Office) because certain packages "can't be
    found", when you go to download them, you get a notice that they've been
    'depreciated, use ____ instead'. You then download them and sometimes you
    get them, sometimes they're not found. Even if you download them, their
    different names, so the other package still won't install... I've yet
    to get Libre Office to install on Debian, yet it installed fine on Vector.
    I prefer running Debian now that I've got it running, but still can't
    install some things... I went to burn a cd-rom and cdrecord wasn't
    installed. I tried apt-get install cdrecord and it couldn't find it...
    I had to search the web for cdrecord and download the file, compile the
    code, then manually install it because apparently the make file didn't
    work right...


    I don't know of any real Linux distro that doesn't have G++. That's GNU C++. If your Linux Distro doesn't do the GNU bit, then whatever their
    C++ complier is will do. Most distro's will pull in the needed stuff to build all of SBBS if you choose their 'development environment' setting during install.
    I wonder how your supposed to install any program if at least parts of
    c++ isn't installed... Though they have c++ and gpp and g++ ... So many
    compilers that all seem to do the same thing...

    curses will be needed, but I don't think you'll need SDL unless you're running XWindows. Tho you may need the dev libraries if you want to
    compile it on a box that doesn't have X on it (it wont run obviously if
    you don't have X, but some folks like to keep their dev build boxes separate from their desktops).
    hmm, I got syncterm running on my web server, which I later installed
    at least some of the XWindows stuff.... I was wondering, I've heard of
    folks running remote XWindows, do I just ssh into my site and startx?
    I'm pretty sure I need more configuration and stuff first, but would
    love to do a remote XWindows... All of kingcoder maintenance is done
    via remote, it's a virtual hosting site that I managed to get sbbs
    compiled on...

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Roach Guts -- kingcoder.net
  • From Chris Trainor@VERT/FLEETHQ to John Guillory on Wed May 2 01:04:36 2012
    Re: Re: SyncTerm on Linux - HOWTO
    By: John Guillory to Chris Trainor on Thu Apr 26 2012 11:36:09

    Hmmm, I played with linux before the kernel hit 1.0.0, but don't stay
    up to date on every flavor of linux, and all the updates. Anyone that
    tries to claim they know all the distrobutions and are up to date on
    everything is either fooling their self or lieing through their teeth.
    Every day they're coming up with a new linux distribution for different
    architectures. Keeping up is next to impossible. New packages added

    Well, most Linux S/A and devs these days don't jump around every distro.
    I agree, too many flavors. But, the two big ones are Debian & RedHat.
    Both have a handful of offshoots (Ubuntu/CentOS,etc) that are very
    similar. So getting a handle on either Debian or RH will help quite a
    bit. Then the trick is to just stick with what you know. I personally started with Slackware then went to Debian. All my personal stuff is
    Debian. I also started using Redhat a bit back when it first came out (personally received a copy of it from Marc Ewing at Unix Expo in 94),
    but never really got into using it a lot till I started working for
    Akamai in 99. In any case, these days I'd generally tell folks if they
    want to do the Linux thing 'professionally', they should go the RedHat
    route. Then learn Debian. Most larger companies run Redhat because of
    the support that's available.



    I wonder how your supposed to install any program if at least parts of
    c++ isn't installed... Though they have c++ and gpp and g++ ... So many
    compilers that all seem to do the same thing...

    Most apps these days are available as packages that are pre-compiled.
    The vast majority of folks who use Linux do not compile apps to install anymore. That basically stopped happening when RedHat came out with 'packages' then Debian followed a short time later with a much improved package system. Nowadays the idea of compiling kernels and installing
    apps from source is generally left to the more advanced users or
    developers.


    hmm, I got syncterm running on my web server, which I later installed
    at least some of the XWindows stuff.... I was wondering, I've heard of
    folks running remote XWindows, do I just ssh into my site and startx?
    I'm pretty sure I need more configuration and stuff first, but would
    love to do a remote XWindows... All of kingcoder maintenance is done
    via remote, it's a virtual hosting site that I managed to get sbbs

    RemoteX is kindof like Remote Desktop or VNC (actualy VNC could be used
    within X for better performance remotely). You can ssh in to establish
    a secure connection over the public internet, but past that you need an
    X Server on your client side. (the X Server is actually the GUI bit, I
    know, folks think 'server' and think it's the remote.. .but not for X).

    So if you install something like Cygwin/X on your Windows Desktop, you
    could in theory (after a bit of muddling around), run X Windows apps on
    a remote machine that has all the appropriate X stuff installed. The
    remote server does not actually need a GUI tho for this to work. Just
    the libraries, apps and such.

    Remote X is a pain in the arse and slow as hell tho. ... I don't
    suggest it to anyone but the truely desperate. :)

    --Chris

    ---------------------------------
    Chris Trainor - FleetHQ BBS
    telnet://bbs.fleethq.org

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ FleetHQ BBS - Greenville, RI
  • From John Guillory@VERT/MAINLINE to Chris Trainor on Wed May 2 09:09:07 2012
    Re: Re: SyncTerm on Linux - HOWTO
    By: Chris Trainor to John Guillory on Wed May 02 2012 01:04 am

    Well, most Linux S/A and devs these days don't jump around every distro.
    I agree, too many flavors. But, the two big ones are Debian & RedHat. Both have a handful of offshoots (Ubuntu/CentOS,etc) that are very
    similar. So getting a handle on either Debian or RH will help quite a
    Well, you have a point on a few things there... I started Slackware
    myself and for some things, would just assume stick with slackware,
    but got to admit, I love Vector-Linux for it's graphical apt manager
    to install programs from. I also use slapt-get, which I read is actually
    from slackware's package management, so a modern slackware might be what
    I need....Redhat's .RPMs was nice, but the repository's I remembered wasn't
    as orgainzed and complete as Slackware/Vector. With Redhat, you generally
    had to go around to the website of the person making the package and
    download the .rpm, install it, etc. I had to do that with a few .tgz files
    for vector linux. There is also RPM for vector/slackware, and apt-get for
    redhat, which helps on the administrator to get familiar, but most isn't
    recommended. I was on a forum the other day and someone suggested if
    a person wasn't familiar with how to download a package, compile it, then
    install it, they needed to stay away from linux. Not good advice, but I
    can understand it. I mean, linux was started for programmers / hackers
    that didn't need to have a cutesy icon to click on in order to install
    software. I hate it when someone tries to mess up a good operating system!
    Like Macintosh... It used to be nice, around 8.6/9.0, then despite what
    most folks think, they had to move more and more things to looking like
    Windows. The more they did, the more I hated it!

    Most apps these days are available as packages that are pre-compiled.
    The vast majority of folks who use Linux do not compile apps to install anymore. That basically stopped happening when RedHat came out with 'packages' then Debian followed a short time later with a much improved package system. Nowadays the idea of compiling kernels and installing apps from source is generally left to the more advanced users or developers.
    With Debian, I later found a site that you give it your location, and it
    would allow you to choose what type of apps you wanted, it'd give you a
    list of servers to add to your file. I'd just assume have like vector
    linux did, a large text file where I can disable all the extra servers,
    then when I look for a file, I don't get not-found on every fricken file
    that is advertised on all the major debian websites as being freely
    available! Eg. That office app, I forget the name of it now, the one
    that loads .pdf files, edits them, then saves them back.... really nice.
    I had to go through leaps and bounds trying to get that on Debian!
    Once I did, it messed up my desktop so bad, I finally went back to vector!

    RemoteX is kindof like Remote Desktop or VNC (actualy VNC could be used within X for better performance remotely). You can ssh in to establish
    a secure connection over the public internet, but past that you need an
    X Server on your client side. (the X Server is actually the GUI bit, I know, folks think 'server' and think it's the remote.. .but not for X).
    At the time I wrote the previous message, I was running Vector Linux with
    xterm to my BBS server (Debian 6/32) on kingcoder.net. My only access to
    kingcoder.net is ssh, sftp, and now telnet/ftp via synchronet. I was
    looking into vnc, and would love to now see a VNC for windows -> the
    Debian VNC server solution in a way... But I think the biggest problem
    is the Debian linux is running on a virtual host. I installed X and a
    few of the popular drivers, fonts, etc. on the virtual host, but how do
    you start the X desktop or run an x application? I tried running xeyes
    and tried typing startx from the ssh on xterm, no luck. From what I read,
    if it was setup right, you just startx or run the application.... I
    probably didn't have enough libraries setup or something.

    So if you install something like Cygwin/X on your Windows Desktop, you could in theory (after a bit of muddling around), run X Windows apps on
    a remote machine that has all the appropriate X stuff installed. The remote server does not actually need a GUI tho for this to work. Just
    the libraries, apps and such.
    Will have to look into Cygwin/X! Sounds interesting! It also would have
    been a thought when I was running Vector on my desktop. I would have
    prefered to do that on my laptop... I was working on trying to get a
    SSH server on my desktop as well, so I could do things from remote on it.
    Granted, I'm still not convinced AT&T is letting me do anything remote
    on any machine, but I've configure the router to allow this machine to
    do anything and still it should allow anything from inside the network
    to connect to it via local IP, which is bugging me on this friggen router!

    Remote X is a pain in the arse and slow as hell tho. ... I don't
    suggest it to anyone but the truely desperate. :)
    I'd imagine... Any time you try to send graphics via modem/internet, etc.
    but... Just thought it'd be nice to go graphical since I was doing linux
    to linux connection...

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Roach Guts -- kingcoder.net
  • From Deuce@VERT/SYNCNIX to John Guillory on Wed May 2 18:55:52 2012
    Re: Re: SyncTerm on Linux - HOWTO
    By: John Guillory to Chris Trainor on Wed May 02 2012 09:09 am

    Remote X is a pain in the arse and slow as hell tho. ... I don't
    suggest it to anyone but the truely desperate. :)
    I'd imagine... Any time you try to send graphics via modem/internet,
    etc.
    but... Just thought it'd be nice to go graphical since I was doing
    linux
    to linux connection...

    Via modem isn't bad, it's the latency if the internet that kills you.

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  • From Dreamer@VERT to John Guillory on Thu May 3 15:09:00 2012
    John Guillory wrote to Chris Trainor <=-

    Debian VNC server solution in a way... But I think the biggest
    problem
    is the Debian linux is running on a virtual host. I installed X and
    a
    few of the popular drivers, fonts, etc. on the virtual host, but how
    do
    you start the X desktop or run an x application? I tried running
    xeyes
    and tried typing startx from the ssh on xterm, no luck. From what I read,
    if it was setup right, you just startx or run the application.... I
    probably didn't have enough libraries setup or something.

    As mentioned in a previous message, the X server runs on your local
    display. The key to keeping in mind which is the server and client is
    that the GUI is serving as the display for your application (client).

    You'll have to make a couple tweaks locally to allow applications
    running on the remote machine to connect, if I remember correctly.
    Try doing a google search for "SSH X11 forwarding", there should be
    some good guides that pop up. Basically, you have to turn on X
    windows port forwarding in SSH. When you connect to the remote shell,
    it'll automatically set your DISPLAY environment variable to a virtual
    terminal that's configured to route the display data through the SSH connection. It's actually quite easy (and kinda cool).


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  • From Mro@VERT/BBSESINF to Dreamer on Fri May 4 17:31:11 2012
    Re: Re: SyncTerm on Linux - HOWTO
    By: Dreamer to John Guillory on Thu May 03 2012 03:09 pm

    some good guides that pop up. Basically, you have to turn on X
    windows port forwarding in SSH. When you connect to the remote shell,
    it'll automatically set your DISPLAY environment variable to a virtual terminal that's configured to route the display data through the SSH connection. It's actually quite easy (and kinda cool).


    yeah it's pretty easy and there's a lot of easy to use programs to help you to do it. it's also a great way to run a bbs in dosbox on a headless server.
    from cli

    ---
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  • From John Guillory@VERT/MAINLINE to Mro on Sat May 5 09:25:44 2012
    Re: Re: SyncTerm on Linux - HOWTO
    By: Mro to Dreamer on Fri May 04 2012 05:31 pm

    yeah it's pretty easy and there's a lot of easy to use programs to help
    you to do it. it's also a great way to run a bbs in dosbox on a headless server. from cli
    O.k. I know you said it's slow as can be via internet and all, but thinking
    of a couple of things... (nostalgia) So if I follow you correctly, no matter
    what OS the BBS runs on, we could write doors so that the doors send the
    X11 codes out, and on the users side, run a terminal that has X11 forwarding
    and a X server, then you can have graphics on your BBS.... True Graphics,
    a thought....

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Roach Guts -- kingcoder.net
  • From Mro@VERT/BBSESINF to John Guillory on Sat May 5 15:40:32 2012
    Re: Re: SyncTerm on Linux - HOWTO
    By: John Guillory to Mro on Sat May 05 2012 09:25 am

    yeah it's pretty easy and there's a lot of easy to use programs to help you to do it. it's also a great way to run a bbs in dosbox on a headless server. from cli

    O.k. I know you said it's slow as can be via internet and all, but thinking

    when did i say what?

    of a couple of things... (nostalgia) So if I follow you correctly, no matter
    what OS the BBS runs on, we could write doors so that the doors send the
    X11 codes out, and on the users side, run a terminal that has X11 forwarding
    and a X server, then you can have graphics on your BBS.... True
    Graphics,
    a thought....

    no, not true graphics. i was suggesting this as a way to trick X so you can run dosbox and a dos bbs software via cli.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ ::: BBSES.info - free BBS services :::
  • From echto@VERT/ECHTOBBS to Mro on Sat May 12 21:06:29 2012
    Re: Re: SyncTerm on Linux - HOWTO
    By: Mro to Dreamer on Fri May 04 2012 17:31:11

    yeah it's pretty easy and there's a lot of easy to use programs to help you to do it. it's also a great way to run a bbs in dosbox on a headless
    server. from cli

    What BBS are your running in dosbox? Source not available for compiling so you
    can run it native?



    echto

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ -=-= echto bbs =-=-
  • From Warp 4@VERT/MSBGTN01 to Generalram on Thu Oct 31 15:39:00 2013
    Re: Re: SyncTerm on Linux - HOWTO
    By: Generalram to Purple Nurple on Tue Apr 17 2012 12:08 am


    Hello all.

    How does one install SyncTerm on Linux? I got the cryptlib file, and am
    unab to make the file. I followed instructions, but came up short. It says on the screen:

    make: -c: Command not found

    Please help!?

    It's difficult to tell from your message, but are you trying to build SyncTerm from source? If so, perhaps GNU make (and probably the compiler,
    requisite libraries, headers, etc.) have not yet been installed on your machine?


    Use make instead of gmake.

    sudo apt-get install g++
    sudo atp-get install cvs
    sudo apt-get install gcc


    Would be easier to just run 'sudo apt-get install build-essential' on Debian based systems.

    ---
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