• analog modem on VOIP

    From Hemo@VERT/UJOINT to All on Fri Sep 23 09:49:54 2016
    Anyone have any success with using a modem on a VOIP line?

    Geez.. am I really that old that when I am talking to 'technical support' for my VOIP provider, they have no clue what I am talking about.. a 'modem' is the device that connects to the cable provider to provide internet services..

    It looks as though if one has a desire to use an analog modem, it requires a POTS connection to good old copper.

    ... Sometimes I sits and thinks, and sometimes I just sits.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ - Running madly into the wind and screaming - bbs.ujoint.org
  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Hemo on Sat Sep 24 08:20:00 2016
    Hemo wrote to All <=-

    It looks as though if one has a desire to use an analog modem, it
    requires a POTS connection to good old copper.

    Or be able to support yourself, without relying on tech support. :) Maybe I should hook up a modem to an ATA and test, call another modem, which I'd have to install on the POTS line. :)


    ... Always drink upstream from the herd.
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  • From Digital Man@VERT to Hemo on Fri Sep 23 20:31:49 2016
    Re: analog modem on VOIP
    By: Hemo to All on Fri Sep 23 2016 09:49 am

    Anyone have any success with using a modem on a VOIP line?

    Geez.. am I really that old that when I am talking to 'technical support' for my VOIP provider, they have no clue what I am talking about.. a 'modem' is the device that connects to the cable provider to provide internet services..

    It looks as though if one has a desire to use an analog modem, it requires a POTS connection to good old copper.

    My POTS line is technically VOIP as its through my cable provider (over IP), but the quality is really high, so I get 28+Kbps connections no problem.

    digital man

    Synchronet/BBS Terminology Definition #1:
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  • From Knightmare@VERT/P99BBS to Hemo on Fri Sep 23 23:25:15 2016
    Re: analog modem on VOIP
    By: Hemo to All on Fri Sep 23 2016 09:49 am

    Anyone have any success with using a modem on a VOIP line?

    Geez.. am I really that old that when I am talking to 'technical support' for my VOIP provider, they have no clue what I am talking about.. a 'modem' is the device that connects to the cable provider to provide internet services..

    It looks as though if one has a desire to use an analog modem, it requires a POTS connection to good old copper.

    ... Sometimes I sits and thinks, and sometimes I just sits.


    You can *MAYBE* use it to dial out, if it has a bland-dial feature. As far as inbound, that's gonna be
    pretty dicey. You're going to have to have a really good and clean line, but when it comes down to it,
    as you said before, you're better off with a landline to use an analog device.

    We tried to use a fax-modem at work over a VOIP line and it worked, but we had to remove compression and
    drop the baud rate to 9600. Which for a fax, is okay, I guess...

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Precinct 99 BBS -- p99bbs.homenet.org - Lewis Center, OH USA
  • From Knightmare@VERT/P99BBS to Hemo on Fri Sep 23 23:27:03 2016
    That's supposed to be "blind-dial", not "bland-dial", whatever the hell that is... lol

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Precinct 99 BBS -- p99bbs.homenet.org - Lewis Center, OH USA
  • From Hemo@VERT/UJOINT to Vk3jed on Sat Sep 24 01:07:07 2016
    Re: Re: analog modem on VOIP
    By: Vk3jed to Hemo on Sat Sep 24 2016 08:20 am

    Hemo wrote to All <=-

    It looks as though if one has a desire to use an analog modem, it
    requires a POTS connection to good old copper.

    Or be able to support yourself, without relying on tech support. :) Maybe I should hook up a modem to an ATA and test, call another modem, which I'd have to install on the POTS line. :)


    oy.. you lost me there. If I could change the protocol and compression on the voip line without calling 'tech support' I'd be doing just that.

    I have the modems hooked up and can call each other, but no go with any connects to the modem on the voip line. It answers fine enough, but Ooma doesn't appear to support any protocols that are effective for data.

    ... Americans like fat books and thin women

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ - Running madly into the wind and screaming - bbs.ujoint.org
  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Hemo on Sat Sep 24 17:04:00 2016
    Hemo wrote to Vk3jed <=-

    oy.. you lost me there. If I could change the protocol and
    compression on the voip line without calling 'tech support' I'd be
    doing just that.

    Sometimes the VoIP provider supports a range of codecs, and you just have to force your end to something appropriate, such as uLaw or ALaw. Some VoIP providers (mainly the ones targeting the tech geeks) allow you to configure the available codecs, and even the order of preference.

    I have the modems hooked up and can call each other, but no go with any connects to the modem on the voip line. It answers fine enough, but
    Ooma doesn't appear to support any protocols that are effective for
    data.

    Bummer. :( One of my providers will let me explicitly force a suitable codec. I suspect the other can do uLaw and/or ALaw, I just have to force it on my ATA.
    A complicating factor in my setup is I am using a local switch, and I'm not sure if I can force the codec choice there.


    ... Anyone can get old. All you have to do is live long enough.
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  • From Hemo@VERT/UJOINT to Vk3jed on Sat Sep 24 10:31:05 2016
    Re: Re: analog modem on VOIP
    By: Vk3jed to Hemo on Sat Sep 24 2016 05:04 pm

    Sometimes the VoIP provider supports a range of codecs, and you just have to force your end to something appropriate, such as uLaw or ALaw. Some VoIP providers (mainly the ones targeting the tech geeks) allow you to configure the available codecs, and even the order of preference.

    yeah.. that would be my issue. I chose a voip provider long before I ever thought of using it for data modem, and Ooma has extremely limited options for the end user to mess around with. It's basically a box that gets plugged in and you can configure a voicemail greeting and not much else.

    Ooma claims to function incoming fax calls, but I have an old Panasonic fax machine here and I can't get that to receive a fax through Ooma, either. And the claim is there, but Ooma also states they offer limited (read: none) support for fax issues.

    I guess I need to start exploring other voip providers out there and see what others in my area have had success with.

    ... The mistake you make is in trying to figure it out.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ - Running madly into the wind and screaming - bbs.ujoint.org
  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Hemo on Sun Sep 25 08:16:00 2016
    Hemo wrote to Vk3jed <=-

    yeah.. that would be my issue. I chose a voip provider long before I
    ever thought of using it for data modem, and Ooma has extremely limited options for the end user to mess around with. It's basically a box
    that gets plugged in and you can configure a voicemail greeting and not much else.

    Yeah, we have providers like that. One of mine is the other extreme, just about everything is configurable through their web interface.

    Ooma claims to function incoming fax calls, but I have an old Panasonic fax machine here and I can't get that to receive a fax through Ooma, either. And the claim is there, but Ooma also states they offer limited (read: none) support for fax issues.

    I see, that's annoying.

    I guess I need to start exploring other voip providers out there and
    see what others in my area have had success with.

    Definitely an option. There's probably a gazillion out there.


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  • From Matthew Munson@VERT/IUTOPIA to HEMO on Sat Sep 24 12:33:00 2016
    It looks as though if one has a desire to use an analog modem, it requires a POTS connection to good old copper.
    I would love a POTS copper line but many companies are refusing to issue
    them.


    ---
    ■ wcQWK 7.0
  • From IronMan@VERT to Vk3jed on Sun Sep 25 14:15:44 2016
    Hemo wrote to Vk3jed <=-

    oy.. you lost me there. If I could change the protocol and compression on the voip line without calling 'tech support' I'd be doing just that.

    Sometimes the VoIP provider supports a range of codecs, and you just have to force your end to something appropriate, such as uLaw or ALaw. Some VoIP providers (mainly the ones targeting the tech geeks) allow you to configure the available codecs, and even the order of preference.

    I have the modems hooked up and can call each other, but no go with any connects to the modem on the voip line. It answers fine enough, but Ooma doesn't appear to support any protocols that are effective for data.

    Bummer. :( One of my providers will let me explicitly force a suitable codec. I suspect the other can do uLaw and/or ALaw, I just have to force it on my ATA.
    A complicating factor in my setup is I am using a local switch, and I'm not sure if I can force the codec choice there.


    ... Anyone can get old. All you have to do is live long enough.
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.49
    ■ Synchronet ■ Freeway BBS in Bendigo, Australia.


    Best codec of the lowest data consumption would be the G729 codec, That's what I use on all the
    ATA's in my office and it works good.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Vertrauen ■ Home of Synchronet ■ telnet://vert.synchro.net
  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to IronMan on Mon Sep 26 16:06:00 2016
    IronMan wrote to Vk3jed <=-

    Best codec of the lowest data consumption would be the G729 codec,
    That's what I use on all the
    ATA's in my office and it works good.

    For data over VoIP? That's what we're talking about here - running analog modems over a VoIP circuit.


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    ■ Synchronet ■ Freeway BBS in Bendigo, Australia.
  • From Misfit@VERT/EMERALD to Hemo on Sun Sep 25 22:07:25 2016
    Re: analog modem on VOIP
    By: Hemo to All on Fri Sep 23 2016 09:49 am

    I just have el-cheapo MagicJack ($100 for 5 years) that I use for my fax machines. Perhaps I'm an exception and/or lucky, but it consistently works fine with my fax machines at 33.6 kbps. Now, using it with my external USR 56.6 Sportster was another story. Out of boredome/nostalgia, called DM's Vert board with it a while back and while it was ok for reading/writing messages, I woukdn't want to attemp ZModem over it. Course, it might've been because of my setup. I have three fax machines (don't ask why) and my modem was going through two of them.

    It is, at least around here, hard to even find POTS providers these days...

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Emeraldhill BBS - telnet://bbs.emeraldhill.org - http://bbs.emeraldhill.org:8080
  • From Hemo@VERT/UJOINT to Misfit on Mon Sep 26 08:15:33 2016
    Re: analog modem on VOIP
    By: Misfit to Hemo on Sun Sep 25 2016 10:07 pm

    Re: analog modem on VOIP
    I just have el-cheapo MagicJack ($100 for 5 years) that I use for my fax machines. Perhaps I'm an exception and/or lucky, but it consistently works fine with my fax machines at 33.6 kbps. Now, using it with my external USR 56.6 Sportster was another story. Out of boredome/nostalgia, called DM's Vert board with it a while back and while it was ok for reading/writing messages, I woukdn't want to attemp ZModem over it. Course, it might've been because of my setup. I have three fax machines (don't ask why) and my modem was going through two of them.

    Hmmm... I should ping my local colleagues and see if one has a magicjack laying around that I could at least test with. I'm not against spending some money if I have an idea how well it would work.

    It is, at least around here, hard to even find POTS providers these days...

    And that is my last option, because of expense, though it is a pretty much a working deal if I do it. My place is already wired for 4 lines, and we switched from AT&T land lines about 12 years ago due to the excessive costs involved. I can't justify the cost at this point for the hobby.

    ... It is a good thing for an uneducated man to read books of quotations.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ - Running madly into the wind and screaming - bbs.ujoint.org
  • From Poindexter Fortran@VERT/REALITY to Vk3jed on Tue Sep 27 09:23:00 2016
    Vk3jed wrote to IronMan <=-

    Best codec of the lowest data consumption would be the G729 codec,
    That's what I use on all the
    ATA's in my office and it works good.

    For data over VoIP? That's what we're talking about here - running
    analog modems over a VoIP circuit.

    The data is being modulated into an analog signal, which is going over
    an analog talk path. G.729 is one of the least lossy ways to send voice
    data, so it's a good choice for data applications.

    In a nutshell, the problem is that copper phone lines could transmit a
    much wider range of frequencies, more than normal voice uses. Modems
    could use all of the range and worked just fine. In running voice over
    IP, providers sometimes use methods that have enough range to transmit
    speech, but not modem tones, in order to cram more conversations into a
    given data path.




    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.49
    ■ Synchronet ■ realitycheckBBS -- http://realitycheckBBS.org
  • From Sampsa@VERT/B4BBS to Poindexter Fortran on Tue Sep 27 21:28:00 2016
    Poindexter Fortran wrote to Vk3jed <=-

    @VIA: VERT/REALITY
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    @REPLY: <57E8C0D1.381.dove-hwswhelp@freeway.apana.org.au>
    @TZ: c1e0
    Vk3jed wrote to IronMan <=-

    Best codec of the lowest data consumption would be the G729 codec,
    That's what I use on all the
    ATA's in my office and it works good.

    For data over VoIP? That's what we're talking about here - running
    analog modems over a VoIP circuit.

    The data is being modulated into an analog signal, which is going over
    an analog talk path. G.729 is one of the least lossy ways to send voice data, so it's a good choice for data applications.

    In a nutshell, the problem is that copper phone lines could transmit a much wider range of frequencies, more than normal voice uses. Modems
    could use all of the range and worked just fine. In running voice over
    IP, providers sometimes use methods that have enough range to transmit speech, but not modem tones, in order to cram more conversations into a given data path.

    We have a guy on SIMNET using G.711a and that seems to work too, in case you can't get G.729..

    Sampsa

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  • From Hemo@VERT/UJOINT to Sampsa on Tue Sep 27 15:12:50 2016
    Re: Re: analog modem on VOIP
    By: Sampsa to Poindexter Fortran on Tue Sep 27 2016 09:28 pm

    We have a guy on SIMNET using G.711a and that seems to work too, in case you can't get G.729..

    When configuring Ooma, I can choose from "Phone/Fax" or "Alarm" use for the line. I called their 'technical' support to inquire which codecs are used for each option and the reply was 'Certainly, I'd be happy to assist you with this issue. You can choose to use either phone/fax or alarm mode.'

    Umm.. ok.. that explains it. I looked in the mirror and I have dfghjk indents on my forehead from banging it on my keyboard everytime I get to talk with Ooma's support folk.

    Heading off to check their forums and see if any educated users can reveal more info about codecs in use.

    ... There are no answers, only cross-references!

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ - Running madly into the wind and screaming - bbs.ujoint.org
  • From Poindexter Fortran@VERT/REALITY to Sampsa on Tue Sep 27 16:32:20 2016
    Re: Re: analog modem on VOIP
    By: Sampsa to Poindexter Fortran on Tue Sep 27 2016 09:28 pm

    We have a guy on SIMNET using G.711a and that seems to work too, in case you can't get G.729..

    Man, I've forgotten so much of this stuff... Corporate VOIP was fun for a
    time.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ realitycheckBBS -- http://realitycheckBBS.org
  • From Poindexter Fortran@VERT/REALITY to Hemo on Tue Sep 27 16:37:41 2016
    Re: Re: analog modem on VOIP
    By: Hemo to Sampsa on Tue Sep 27 2016 03:12 pm

    When configuring Ooma, I can choose from "Phone/Fax" or "Alarm" use for the line. I called their 'technical' support to inquire which codecs are used for each option and the reply was 'Certainly, I'd be happy to assist you with this issue. You can choose to use either phone/fax or alarm mode.'

    A quick google sounds like they support IlBC and G.711 at the very least -
    dial *96 for ILBC and *98 for G.711.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ realitycheckBBS -- http://realitycheckBBS.org
  • From Hemo@VERT/UJOINT to Poindexter Fortran on Tue Sep 27 20:08:33 2016
    Re: Re: analog modem on VOIP
    By: Poindexter Fortran to Hemo on Tue Sep 27 2016 04:37 pm

    Re: Re: analog modem on VOIP
    By: Hemo to Sampsa on Tue Sep 27 2016 03:12 pm

    When configuring Ooma, I can choose from "Phone/Fax" or "Alarm" use
    for the line. I called their 'technical' support to inquire which
    codecs are used for each option and the reply was 'Certainly, I'd be
    happy to assist you with this issue. You can choose to use either
    phone/fax or alarm mode.'

    A quick google sounds like they support IlBC and G.711 at the very least - dial *96 for ILBC and *98 for G.711.

    I've gotten that far, but I need it enabled all the time, as this is for a dial-in modem, not me dialing out. I've only had limited success dialing out using those codes to connect to a modem.

    ... What's the speed of dark?

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ - Running madly into the wind and screaming - bbs.ujoint.org
  • From Sampsa@VERT/B4BBS to Poindexter Fortran on Wed Sep 28 05:40:00 2016
    Poindexter Fortran wrote to Hemo <=-

    A quick google sounds like they support IlBC and G.711 at the very
    least - dial *96 for ILBC and *98 for G.711.

    Cool, try dialling 405 4983703 and see what happens.

    Sampsa

    ... MultiMail, the new multi-platform, multi-format offline reader!
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  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Poindexter Fortran on Wed Sep 28 08:31:00 2016
    Poindexter Fortran wrote to Vk3jed <=-

    The data is being modulated into an analog signal, which is going over
    an analog talk path. G.729 is one of the least lossy ways to send voice data, so it's a good choice for data applications.

    While it uses more data, I'd go for uLaw or ALaw (IIRC, G711u or G711a respectively), as these are the same as used on analog phone lines.

    In a nutshell, the problem is that copper phone lines could transmit a much wider range of frequencies, more than normal voice uses. Modems
    could use all of the range and worked just fine. In running voice over
    IP, providers sometimes use methods that have enough range to transmit speech, but not modem tones, in order to cram more conversations into a given data path.

    It's a lot more complex than that. Voice codecs are designed to transmit speech using as litle data as possible. In otherwords, the art of speech compression is throwing as much away as possible, while retaining acceptable speech quality. Techniques range from non-linear sampling (uLaw/ALaw) to different means of coding the waveform, to modelling speech. The latter yielding the greatest compression - examples include LPC-10, AMBE family (commonly used in digital 2 way radio), CELP and Codec2 (this has a 700 bit/second mode). However, as most of these techniques are designed to encode speech at as low a bitrate as possible, their effect on modem tones is uncertain and most likely detrimental.

    I'm curious. Have you tried G729, and what bitrate do you get over a G729 circuit?


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  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Sampsa on Wed Sep 28 08:40:00 2016
    Sampsa wrote to Poindexter Fortran <=-

    We have a guy on SIMNET using G.711a and that seems to work too, in
    case you can't get G.729..

    I'd be surprised if G.711a didn't work, since it's the same as used on POTS lines on this part of the world (ever since exchanges went digital).


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  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Poindexter Fortran on Wed Sep 28 13:21:00 2016
    Poindexter Fortran wrote to Sampsa <=-

    We have a guy on SIMNET using G.711a and that seems to work too, in case you can't get G.729..

    Man, I've forgotten so much of this stuff... Corporate VOIP was fun for
    a time.

    For me, there's an intersection between ham radio, VoIP, telephony and data. I've had some form of VoIP telephony running for over a decade. And I've tried shoving all sorts of stuff over VoIP, like the SSTV over IRLP experiments in 2004 (ADPCM works well, GSM is iffy).


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  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Poindexter Fortran on Wed Sep 28 13:22:00 2016
    Poindexter Fortran wrote to Hemo <=-

    A quick google sounds like they support IlBC and G.711 at the very
    least - dial *96 for ILBC and *98 for G.711.

    G.711 should work fine. Try that setting.


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  • From Reverb@VERT/CBLISS to Hemo on Sun Oct 2 09:02:13 2016
    Re: analog modem on VOIP
    By: Hemo to All on Fri Sep 23 2016 09:49:54

    Anyone have any success with using a modem on a VOIP line?

    Geez.. am I really that old that when I am talking to 'technical support' fo my VOIP provider, they have no clue what I am talking about.. a 'modem' is t device that connects to the cable provider to provide internet services..

    It looks as though if one has a desire to use an analog modem, it requires a POTS connection to good old copper.

    I use my analog modem for faxing (still widely used for medical and legal information). It's hit-and-miss. If it's just one or two pages usually there are no issues. Anything 5 or more pages requires multiple retries and multiple phone calls to confirm what was received and what needs to be re-sent. Doesn't seem to make any difference on speed, I've tried 4800-14.4K, same problem.
    When I had copper POTS I had problems too, but it was mostly due to line noise It was not as bad with POTS as it is with VOIP.

    Unfortunately they don't have copper POTS here anymore, all your phone service comes from your cable/internet provider so you're stuck with VOIP.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ chaotic bliss - chaoticbliss.darktech.org
  • From Sampsa@VERT/B4BBS to Reverb on Mon Oct 3 19:29:00 2016
    Reverb wrote to Hemo <=-

    Geez.. am I really that old that when I am talking to 'technical support' fo my VOIP provider, they have no clue what I am talking about.. a 'modem' is t device that connects to the cable provider to provide internet services..

    It looks as though if one has a desire to use an analog modem, it requires a POTS connection to good old copper.

    I use my analog modem for faxing (still widely used for medical and
    legal information). It's hit-and-miss. If it's just one or two pages usually there are no issues. Anything 5 or more pages requires
    multiple retries and multiple phone calls to confirm what was received
    and what needs to be re-sent. Doesn't seem to make any difference on speed, I've tried 4800-14.4K, same problem. When I had copper POTS I
    had problems too, but it was mostly due to line noise It was not as bad with POTS as it is with VOIP.

    Unfortunately they don't have copper POTS here anymore, all your phone service comes from your cable/internet provider so you're stuck with
    VOIP.

    Really depends on your VOIP provider from what I can gather - if you can
    use the G.711a codec and turn off echo-cancellation, you might get OK
    results.

    We have a guy on SIMNET in Romania and he's getting consistent 24Kbps+
    results with his setup.

    Sampsa

    ... MultiMail, the new multi-platform, multi-format offline reader!
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  • From Night Owl@VERT/DH1 to Reverb on Tue Oct 4 21:40:18 2016
    Re: analog modem on VOIP
    By: Reverb to Hemo on Sun Oct 02 2016 09:02 am

    Re: analog modem on VOIP
    By: Hemo to All on Fri Sep 23 2016 09:49:54

    Anyone have any success with using a modem on a VOIP line?

    Geez.. am I really that old that when I am talking to 'technical support' my VOIP provider, they have no clue what I am talking about.. a 'modem' i device that connects to the cable provider to provide internet services..

    It looks as though if one has a desire to use an analog modem, it require POTS connection to good old copper.

    I use my analog modem for faxing (still widely used for medical and legal information). It's hit-and-miss. If it's just one or two pages usually the are no issues. Anything 5 or more pages requires multiple retries and multi phone calls to confirm what was received and what needs to be re-sent. Does seem to make any difference on speed, I've tried 4800-14.4K, same problem. When I had copper POTS I had problems too, but it was mostly due to line noi It was not as bad with POTS as it is with VOIP.

    Unfortunately they don't have copper POTS here anymore, all your phone servi comes from your cable/internet provider so you're stuck with VOIP.

    hi, i use voip.ms on a old vonage modem and it works great with me with no hicups, just use the codec that has zero compression, i tryed magic jack and had zero luck with them.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Volatile Radio - volatilerdio.ddns.net
  • From Poindexter Fortran@VERT/REALITY to Night Owl on Wed Oct 5 09:32:39 2016
    Re: analog modem on VOIP
    By: Night Owl to Reverb on Tue Oct 04 2016 09:40 pm

    hi, i use voip.ms on a old vonage modem and it works great with me with no hicups, just use the codec that has zero compression, i tryed magic jack and had zero luck with them.

    Did you have to do anything special with the Vonage modem to make it work with voip.ms? I see a Vonage Box phone adapter going for around $10 bucks, and I'm tempted to try a modem dialin with it.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ realitycheckBBS -- http://realitycheckBBS.org
  • From C64@VERT/DH1 to Poindexter Fortran on Wed Oct 5 14:41:29 2016
    Re: analog modem on VOIP
    By: Poindexter Fortran to Night Owl on Wed Oct 05 2016 09:32 am

    Re: analog modem on VOIP
    By: Night Owl to Reverb on Tue Oct 04 2016 09:40 pm

    hi, i use voip.ms on a old vonage modem and it works great with me with hicups, just use the codec that has zero compression, i tryed magic jac and had zero luck with them.

    Did you have to do anything special with the Vonage modem to make it work wi voip.ms? I see a Vonage Box phone adapter going for around $10 bucks, and I' tempted to try a modem dialin with it.

    i had to hack the box to beable to use voip.ms, this site helped me throgh it https://thegeekoftheworld.com/unlock-rtp300/comment-page-1/ , i have a linksys rpt300 router and vonage modem all in one, the hack was easy with the instructions, and read the comments if you can get it working on fist go around,

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  • From Deepend to Hemo on Wed Dec 7 16:36:47 2016
    Anyone have any success with using a modem on a VOIP line?

    I have done some testing with my VoIP line I have and generally got up to 38400 fairly stable. But best was at around 19200.
  • From Dumas Walker@VERT/CAPCITY2 to Hemo on Thu Dec 8 18:24:00 2016
    Anyone have any success with using a modem on a VOIP line?

    Technically, my local phone service is VOIP, I guess. It comes into the
    house over the TV cable, along with the cable TV and the internet. It
    actually seems to work pretty good. Maybe not as good as the old copper
    lines, but pretty good.

    I thought about replacing it with a MagicJack as that is what my voice line
    is on. I have not found it to be so great when trying to make modem-to-modem calls, though. When I try to call my BBS from another machine that is hooked to the MJ, my results are not consistent at all. Sometimes the connections
    are acceptable, while others they are pretty bad.

    I have read in various BBS forums about people trying various protocol
    settings on their VOIP calls that can improve reliability, but not all VOIP providers allow you to configure those. I don't know if MJ does or not as I have not tried that hard. :)


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