• Re: Intro to pc:: question on editing

    From Jon Justvig@VERT/STEPPING to Nightfox on Fri Oct 27 00:34:37 2017
    Re: Re: Intro to pc:: question on editing
    By: Nightfox to MRO on Thu Oct 26 2017 03:13 pm

    Nightfox,

    i use an old version of slyedit.

    Why the old version? Are there any issues you saw with newer versions that you'd like to see fixed?

    I enjoy the SlyEdit v1.51, not sure if that is the latest, but it meets my need.

    ---

    Sincerely,
    Jon Justvig (1:298/25)
    Stepping Stone BBS
    Legion RPG HQ
    http://vintagebbsing.com:81
    telnet://vintagebbsing.com
    ssh://vintagebbsing.com
    trillian: cr1mson
    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Stepping Stone BBS -- vintagebbsing.com
  • From Jon Justvig@VERT/STEPPING to Jagossel on Fri Oct 27 00:36:07 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to computers
    By: Jagossel to Ennev on Thu Oct 26 2017 07:59 pm

    Jagossel,

    We had a modem for the TRS-80 as well, but never used it. Now, I'm curious as to what it would have been like to connect to a BBS on a TRS-80. We had everything to use the modem (including a terminal software on cartrige), just never used it.

    Just picture one letter at a time scrolling across your screen as you try to read 3 or 4 pages of a message.

    ---

    Sincerely,
    Jon Justvig (1:298/25)
    Stepping Stone BBS
    Legion RPG HQ
    http://vintagebbsing.com:81
    telnet://vintagebbsing.com
    ssh://vintagebbsing.com
    trillian: cr1mson
    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Stepping Stone BBS -- vintagebbsing.com
  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to Jon Justvig on Fri Oct 27 13:59:42 2017
    Re: Re: Intro to pc:: question on editing
    By: Jon Justvig to Nightfox on Fri Oct 27 2017 12:34 am

    I enjoy the SlyEdit v1.51, not sure if that is the latest, but it meets my need.

    That's the latest version. :)

    Eric

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Digital Distortion: digitaldistortionbbs.com
  • From Jagossel@VERT/MTLGEEK to Jon Justvig on Fri Oct 27 17:26:13 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to computers
    By: Jon Justvig to Jagossel on Fri Oct 27 2017 00:36:07


    We had a modem for the TRS-80 as well, but never used it. Now, I'm curi as to what it would have been like to connect to a BBS on a TRS-80. We everything to use the modem (including a terminal software on cartrige) just never used it.

    Just picture one letter at a time scrolling across your screen as you try to read 3 or 4 pages of a message.

    Something like what you would get if your put SyncTERM's baud rate simulation down to 300? :D I never had the pleasure of using a 300 baud modem, I think we started out with 9600 when we got serious about BBSes.

    Probably just gave my age away a bit, there. :)

    -jag
    Code it, Script it, Automate it!

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ MtlGeek - Geeks in Montreal - http://mtlgeek.com/ -
  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to Jagossel on Fri Oct 27 16:57:20 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to computers
    By: Jagossel to Jon Justvig on Fri Oct 27 2017 05:26 pm

    Something like what you would get if your put SyncTERM's baud rate simulation down to 300? :D I never had the pleasure of using a 300 baud

    I've used SyncTerm's baud rate simulation to help when I optimize screen updates in my Synchronet mods. When you lower the simulated baud rate, you really notice when there are any inefficient screen updates..

    Nightfox

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Digital Distortion: digitaldistortionbbs.com
  • From Denn@VERT/OUTWEST to Jagossel on Fri Oct 27 22:42:00 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to computers
    By: Jagossel to Jon Justvig on Fri Oct 27 2017 05:26 pm

    We had a modem for the TRS-80 as well, but never used it. Now, I'm
    curi as to what it would have been like to connect to a BBS on a
    TRS-80. We everything to use the modem (including a terminal
    software on cartrige) just never used it.

    My brother had a 300 baud modem for the Color Computer 2, you would manually dial the number then set the hand set on the modem to comunicate with a BBS. When I bought my Color Computer 2 I bought an auto call/answer 1200 baud modem.

    "... A Mind is a terrible thing to waste, A waste is a terrible thing to Mind!"

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ the Outwest BBS - outwestbbs.com Telnet - outwestbbs.com:23
  • From Ennev@VERT/MTLGEEK to Jagossel on Sat Oct 28 08:45:34 2017

    Probably just gave my age away a bit, there. :)

    Totally did :-)

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ MtlGeek - Geeks in Montreal - http://mtlgeek.com/ -
  • From Jon Justvig@VERT/STEPPING to Nightfox on Fri Oct 27 23:20:32 2017
    Re: Re: Intro to pc:: question on editing
    By: Nightfox to Jon Justvig on Fri Oct 27 2017 01:59 pm

    Nightfox,

    Re: Re: Intro to pc:: question on editing
    By: Jon Justvig to Nightfox on Fri Oct 27 2017 12:34 am

    I enjoy the SlyEdit v1.51, not sure if that is the latest, but it
    meets my need.

    That's the latest version. :)

    I was hoping so, as I just upgraded Synchronet nightly build just a few days ago. Keep up the good work!

    ---

    Sincerely,
    Jon Justvig (1:298/25)
    Stepping Stone BBS
    Legion RPG HQ
    http://vintagebbsing.com:81
    telnet://vintagebbsing.com
    ssh://vintagebbsing.com
    trillian: cr1mson
    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Stepping Stone BBS -- vintagebbsing.com
  • From Jon Justvig@VERT/STEPPING to Jagossel on Fri Oct 27 23:22:56 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to computers
    By: Jagossel to Jon Justvig on Fri Oct 27 2017 05:26 pm

    Jagossel,

    Re: Re: Introduction to computers
    Just picture one letter at a time scrolling across your screen as you
    try to read 3 or 4 pages of a message.

    Something like what you would get if your put SyncTERM's baud rate simulation down to 300? :D I never had the pleasure of using a 300 baud modem, I think we started out with 9600 when we got serious about BBSes.

    Yeah, pretty much. I started on 300 baud way back then. It was pretty cool at the time. Sort of like how we think the speed is now compared to what it will be in the next generation or two from now.

    Probably just gave my age away a bit, there. :)

    Just a little. At least your age doesn't equal your baud rate. :)

    ---

    Sincerely,
    Jon Justvig (1:298/25)
    Stepping Stone BBS
    Legion RPG HQ
    http://vintagebbsing.com:81
    telnet://vintagebbsing.com
    ssh://vintagebbsing.com
    trillian: cr1mson
    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Stepping Stone BBS -- vintagebbsing.com
  • From Dumas Walker@VERT/CAPCITY2/CAPCITY3 to JAGOSSEL on Sat Oct 28 17:15:00 2017
    Something like what you would get if your put SyncTERM's baud rate simulation >down to 300? :D I never had the pleasure of using a 300 baud modem, I think we
    started out with 9600 when we got serious about BBSes.
    Probably just gave my age away a bit, there. :)

    I started with a 2400 baud modem, that was sometimes only reliable at 1200,
    at a time when some of the local boards were still advertising 2400 like it
    was a big deal, while others were just upgrading to 9600 HST. :)

    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ "Did you open the Microwave door before the 'ding'"?
    ■ Synchronet ■ CAPCITY3 Test System
  • From MRO@VERT/BBSESINF to Jon Justvig on Sun Oct 29 00:03:34 2017
    Re: Re: Intro to pc:: question on editing
    By: Jon Justvig to MRO on Thu Oct 26 2017 08:28 pm

    Re: Re: Intro to pc:: question on editing
    By: MRO to Ennev on Wed Oct 25 2017 09:13 pm

    Re: Re: Intro to pc:: question on editing
    By: Ennev to Bigbangnet on Wed Oct 25 2017 07:21 am
    sysops: Any other good editor for Synchro on linux ?

    i use an old version of slyedit.

    SlyEdit [ICE] is the best.



    yeah it's like iceedit/quikedit in appearance.
    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ ::: BBSES.info - free BBS services :::
  • From Jon Justvig@VERT/STEPPING to Dumas Walker on Sun Oct 29 01:11:13 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Dumas Walker to JAGOSSEL on Sat Oct 28 2017 05:15 pm

    Dumas,

    I started with a 2400 baud modem, that was sometimes only reliable at 1200, at a time when some of the local boards were still advertising 2400 like it was a big deal, while others were just upgrading to 9600 HST. :)

    Sometime in the future, we will look back and think 10MBps is a fast speed when 10GBps comes around. What is the future insight anyway. I have wondered if internet or telecommunications of some sort will be linked to a power outlet instead of a 2wire land line or a cat/ethernet cable. All we really need is the 0s and 1s anyway.

    ---

    Sincerely,
    Jon Justvig (1:298/25)
    Stepping Stone BBS
    Legion RPG HQ
    http://vintagebbsing.com:81
    telnet://vintagebbsing.com
    ssh://vintagebbsing.com
    trillian: cr1mson
    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Stepping Stone BBS -- vintagebbsing.com
  • From MRO@VERT/BBSESINF to Jon Justvig on Sun Oct 29 13:06:17 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Jon Justvig to Dumas Walker on Sun Oct 29 2017 01:11 am

    when 10GBps comes around. What is the future insight anyway. I have wondered if internet or telecommunications of some sort will be linked to a power outlet instead of a 2wire land line or a cat/ethernet cable. All we really need is the 0s and 1s anyway.


    communications via the power lines has been possible for a long time. i dont think it has good error correction or bandwidth.

    i think the guys in charge will only give us faster speeds when its entirely necessary.
    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ ::: BBSES.info - free BBS services :::
  • From Jon Justvig@VERT/STEPPING to MRO on Sun Oct 29 18:34:00 2017
    Re: Re: Intro to pc:: question on editing
    By: MRO to Jon Justvig on Sun Oct 29 2017 12:03 am

    MRO,

    SlyEdit [ICE] is the best.

    yeah it's like iceedit/quikedit in appearance.

    Only real difference is there is not any kind of registration fees or keys to get it to work. It comes with SBBS, which I feel, has been a great addition to the software.

    ---

    Sincerely,
    Jon Justvig (1:298/25)
    Stepping Stone BBS
    Legion RPG HQ
    http://vintagebbsing.com:81
    telnet://vintagebbsing.com
    ssh://vintagebbsing.com
    trillian: cr1mson
    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Stepping Stone BBS -- vintagebbsing.com
  • From Jon Justvig@VERT/STEPPING to MRO on Sun Oct 29 18:36:08 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: MRO to Jon Justvig on Sun Oct 29 2017 01:06 pm

    MRO,

    communications via the power lines has been possible for a long time. i dont think it has good error correction or bandwidth.

    I would not be suprised. Perhaps, they are working on that before providing it to the masses.

    i think the guys in charge will only give us faster speeds when its entirely necessary.

    Seems to be the way ever since the stone age. Provide as little as you can to gain as much money possible.

    ---

    Sincerely,
    Jon Justvig (1:298/25)
    Stepping Stone BBS
    Legion RPG HQ
    http://vintagebbsing.com:81
    telnet://vintagebbsing.com
    ssh://vintagebbsing.com
    trillian: cr1mson
    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Stepping Stone BBS -- vintagebbsing.com
  • From Denn@VERT/OUTWEST to MRO on Sun Oct 29 21:13:16 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: MRO to Jon Justvig on Sun Oct 29 2017 01:06 pm

    when 10GBps comes around. What is the future insight anyway. I have
    wondered if internet or telecommunications of some sort will be linked
    to a power outlet instead of a 2wire land line or a cat/ethernet
    cable. All we really need is the 0s and 1s anyway.

    communications via the power lines has been possible for a long time. i dont think it has good error correction or bandwidth.


    I think the big problem would be line noise, years ago I tried the power line wifi and the packet loss was horrible.

    "... 53.7% of all statistics are totally incorrect"

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ the Outwest BBS - outwestbbs.com Telnet - outwestbbs.com:23
  • From Ennev@VERT/MTLGEEK to Denn on Mon Oct 30 07:37:43 2017


    I think the big problem would be line noise, years ago I tried the power line wifi and the packet loss was horrible.

    I don't know if it was the case, but I know some countries in Europe like France and here in Canada there as been some pilot project. At the end here i think that i was hard to offer bandwidth that would have competed with what
    was offered with dsl and cable modem. Power being state owned in my province
    it gives us low prices (.0582$/kWh) but I don't think it's a great bed for innovation, I know they do research but not in communication i guess.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ MtlGeek - Geeks in Montreal - http://mtlgeek.com/ -
  • From Bigbangnet@VERT/MTLGEEK to Ennev on Mon Oct 30 12:17:15 2017
    Re: Re: Intro to pc:: question on editing
    By: Ennev to Bigbangnet on Wed Oct 25 2017 07:15:48



    How do you properly edit text here. I mean, I've seen some people cut tex and insert text between it. I've tried to look at the shortcuts but ...id I'm not looking at it properly

    I cheat, most of the time I reply by using the webservice at : http://mtlgeek.synchro.net:8080/ on my board or a use a news reader like thunderbird using port 119.
    using thunderbird...how would I configure that ? just type in the address of mtlgeek.synchronet:8080 and such ? tahts it ?

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ MtlGeek - Geeks in Montreal - http://mtlgeek.com/ -
  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Roadhog on Mon Oct 30 09:53:42 2017
    Re: Win 95
    By: Roadhog to Mr. Cool on Wed Oct 11 2017 10:51 pm

    To me Windows 95 was a DOS shell with a GUI interface.

    It came at a time when system horsepower increased enough to make a task switching system work -- OS/2 could run circles around Windows on a 486, but once you started seeing Pentium MMX systems, I could run my DOS BBS well enough on Windows.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ realitycheckBBS -- http://realitycheckBBS.org
  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Nelgin on Mon Oct 30 09:54:25 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to computers
    By: Nelgin to Nightfox on Thu Oct 12 2017 04:39 am

    I remember that so well that I can still remember the filename.
    PW1118.EXE the Win32S installer. First thing I downloaded onto a
    computer when I had Win 3.1 installed, then Trumpet Winsock and
    probably Mosaic or Cello web browser.

    And WinQVT and WinVN. And Eudora Light.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ realitycheckBBS -- http://realitycheckBBS.org
  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Nightfox on Mon Oct 30 09:57:32 2017
    Re: Introduction to computers
    By: Nightfox to poindexter FORTRAN on Thu Oct 12 2017 12:30 pm

    I heard RLL was just an encoding scheme which worked on MFM drives, so RLL didn't actually require a different controller, just a drive reliable enough to handle RLL encoding.

    RLL would work on some MFM drives and most RLL drives were just "defect-less" MFM drives that surpassed the MFM spec.

    RLL needed a new controller, as it wrote more sectors per track in order to increase the space stored on the drive. A 20 megabyte MFM Seagate ST-225 and 30 megabyte RLL ST-238 were essentially the same drive.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ realitycheckBBS -- http://realitycheckBBS.org
  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Jagossel on Mon Oct 30 10:10:12 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to computers
    By: Jagossel to Jon Justvig on Fri Oct 27 2017 05:26 pm

    Something like what you would get if your put SyncTERM's baud rate simulation down to 300? :D I never had the pleasure of using a 300 baud modem, I think we started out with 9600 when we got serious about BBSes.

    Probably just gave my age away a bit, there. :)

    I did 110 baud on a paper teletype to call BBSes, but mostly to see if it would work.

    I was a telecom manager in a former life and used the TTYs to communicate with our PBXes; I was surprised that old Fido BBSes worked pretty well on paper - except that we used 132 character greenbar paper and Fido only used 40!

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ realitycheckBBS -- http://realitycheckBBS.org
  • From Ennev@VERT/MTLGEEK to Bigbangnet on Mon Oct 30 13:58:12 2017

    using thunderbird...how would I configure that ? just type in the address
    of mtlgeek.synchronet:8080 and such ? tahts it ?

    Well this url is for a browser like firefox, for thunderbird you would need to set it on port 119 for nntp protocol. work very well with thunderbird.

    Would have giving you a printscreen on my setup, but iÆm not home, so iÆm
    using firefox on ios on power 8080 right now. But iÆve check this link https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/creating- newsgroup-account kind of minimal but ok. Usenet protocol is very well support in synchronet.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ MtlGeek - Geeks in Montreal - http://mtlgeek.com/ -
  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to poindexter FORTRAN on Mon Oct 30 13:16:39 2017
    Re: Win 95
    By: poindexter FORTRAN to Roadhog on Mon Oct 30 2017 09:53 am

    To me Windows 95 was a DOS shell with a GUI interface.

    It came at a time when system horsepower increased enough to make a task switching system work -- OS/2 could run circles around Windows on a 486, but once you started seeing Pentium MMX systems, I could run my DOS BBS well enough on Windows.

    I think that implies that OS/2 was a bit more efficient though, at least for multi-tasking DOS applications. I actually had the impression that OS/2 was superior to Windows overall. I've more recently read articles talking about OS/2's GUI task queue being inefficient which could freeze the GUI, but I read that was fixed in (I believe) OS/2 Warp 4.0.

    Nightfox

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Digital Distortion: digitaldistortionbbs.com
  • From MRO@VERT/BBSESINF to Jon Justvig on Mon Oct 30 16:12:32 2017
    Re: Re: Intro to pc:: question on editing
    By: Jon Justvig to MRO on Sun Oct 29 2017 06:34 pm

    Re: Re: Intro to pc:: question on editing
    By: MRO to Jon Justvig on Sun Oct 29 2017 12:03 am

    MRO,

    SlyEdit [ICE] is the best.

    yeah it's like iceedit/quikedit in appearance.

    Only real difference is there is not any kind of registration fees or keys to get it to work. It comes with SBBS, which I feel, has been a great addition to the software.



    well there IS a real difference. it's an executable and slyedit is .js
    also quikedit has other features. i'm not sure slyedit should 'come' with synchronet. i always thought 3rd party addons should stay separate.
    including other people's stuff into the cvs certainly made it quite messy over the years.
    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ ::: BBSES.info - free BBS services :::
  • From MRO@VERT/BBSESINF to Denn on Mon Oct 30 16:13:25 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Denn to MRO on Sun Oct 29 2017 09:13 pm

    communications via the power lines has been possible for a long time. i dont think it has good error correction or bandwidth.


    I think the big problem would be line noise, years ago I tried the power line wifi and the packet loss was horrible.


    should have told your wife to unplug her vibrator.
    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ ::: BBSES.info - free BBS services :::
  • From MRO@VERT/BBSESINF to Ennev on Mon Oct 30 16:17:07 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Ennev to Denn on Mon Oct 30 2017 07:37 am



    I think the big problem would be line noise, years ago I tried the power line wifi and the packet loss was horrible.

    I don't know if it was the case, but I know some countries in Europe like France and here in Canada there as been some pilot project. At the end here i think that i was hard to offer bandwidth that would have competed with what
    was offered with dsl and cable modem. Power being state owned in my province it gives us low prices (.0582$/kWh) but I don't think it's a great bed for innovation, I know they do research but not in communication i guess.


    apparently there is one small city in illinois, usa that has powerline broadband for a population of 7,794.
    th ewebsite i'm on wont pull up the city name, though.
    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ ::: BBSES.info - free BBS services :::
  • From Ennev@VERT/MTLGEEK to MRO on Mon Oct 30 18:41:08 2017
    SlyEdit [ICE] is the best.

    yeah it's like iceedit/quikedit in appearance.

    You convinced me. IÆll give it a try. IÆll see if I can install it in the morning.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ MtlGeek - Geeks in Montreal - http://mtlgeek.com/ -
  • From Derision@VERT/AMIGAC to Ennev on Mon Oct 30 23:11:17 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to computers
    By: Ennev to Derision on Tue Oct 24 2017 07:55:43

    Programming for workbech was easy having a rich library already in the bios. So manipulating strings, windows, file system was dead easy. Even in assembler theses libs where easy to implement. But game programmer prefered to take over the entire system, i guess it was easier when you where porting games. In theses years most devellopers would publish title both on Atari ST and amiga, since they where both using a 68000 as a core cpu it might have been more easy sice the os themselves where dramatically different.

    The sad part is that theses games where made on ST then ported on amiga since
    a 320X200 16 colours game would display on a amiga but not a 320X200 32 colours game. Its really when develloper started to make game for amiga first that the hardware was starting of being really exploited.

    I have been noticing that. One, that often when something's been coded to the hardware, I have to disable certain features on the A500 (I've got minor acceleration, etc., going on). And that lots of the games are straight-up ports of the DOS or Atari versions, and don't make any kind of use of what the Amiga could actually DO. I mean, graphically, the thing was leaps ahead of anything else out there, but I'm still looking at garish 16-color EGA schemes.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Amiga City - The portal for Amiga computers - Over 2,500 files to download for f
  • From Derision@VERT/AMIGAC to Vk3jed on Mon Oct 30 23:14:39 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to computers
    By: Vk3jed to Jagossel on Wed Oct 25 2017 15:31:00

    I was a bit the opposite. I understood assembly, but being able to see the instructions in the wider context of what a program was supposed to do was much harder for me. As a result, I found things like microcontrollers easier to program in Assembler than general purpose machines, because the microcontrollers were generally used for a dedicated purpose and didn't need the complexities of user interaction.

    It took me a while to get assembly, but once I did, it was like a switch flipped. It seemed so simple, compared to other stuff I was learning (or trying to learn) at the time. Mostly just pushing bits from one memory location to another (on the C64, anyway).

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Amiga City - The portal for Amiga computers - Over 2,500 files to download for f
  • From Derision@VERT/AMIGAC to Ennev on Mon Oct 30 23:16:53 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to computers
    By: Ennev to Jagossel on Thu Oct 26 2017 07:32:43

    Newer system like amiga,pc and mac had a bios that wasn't an os. but just a library of standard function and a bootstrap code so the machine could load an os or a game straight from the drive. I'm not sure but i think the Atari ST
    had the full os in rom.

    The Amiga kinda has at least half the OS in ROM... the Kickstart contains the DOS and windowing and whatnot environments.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Amiga City - The portal for Amiga computers - Over 2,500 files to download for f
  • From Derision@VERT/AMIGAC to Denn on Mon Oct 30 23:18:50 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to computers
    By: Denn to Jagossel on Fri Oct 27 2017 22:42:00

    My brother had a 300 baud modem for the Color Computer 2, you would manually dial the number then set the hand set on the modem to comunicate with a BBS. When I bought my Color Computer 2 I bought an auto call/answer 1200 baud modem.

    My first modem was 1200 baud, but I did like to play with 300 every now and then. I remember discovering that most businesses had TTY numbers that I could call up, and it was just a 300 baud dumb ASCII terminal.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Amiga City - The portal for Amiga computers - Over 2,500 files to download for f
  • From Ennev@VERT/MTLGEEK to Ennev on Mon Oct 30 20:00:28 2017

    SlyEdit [ICE] is the best.

    yeah it's like iceedit/quikedit in appearance.

    You convinced me. IÆll give it a try. IÆll see if I can install it in the morning.

    o.k. so i get theses weird characters when i use Firefox on an iPad. I'll remember that..

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ MtlGeek - Geeks in Montreal - http://mtlgeek.com/ -
  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Ennev on Tue Oct 31 11:12:00 2017
    Ennev wrote to Denn <=-


    I think the big problem would be line noise, years ago I tried the power line wifi and the packet loss was horrible.

    I've had mixed results with powerline adapters. The determining factor is whether the two outlets you want to bridge are on the same circuit. If they are, performance is excellent. Otherwise, performance sucks.

    I don't know if it was the case, but I know some countries in Europe
    like France and here in Canada there as been some pilot project. At the end here i think that i was hard to offer bandwidth that would have competed with what was offered with dsl and cable modem. Power being
    state owned in my province it gives us low prices (.0582$/kWh) but I
    don't think it's a great bed for innovation, I know they do research
    but not in communication i guess.

    As for Internet access over power lines, not a great idea. Putting high frequency signals onto open lines is called a radio transmitter, and you're going to cause huge interference to HF radio communication - not just hams, but long haul aircraft and other services. And you will suffer interference from legitimate transmitters as well.


    ... Chemists do it on the bench!
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.49
    ■ Synchronet ■ Freeway BBS in Bendigo, Australia.
  • From MRO@VERT/BBSESINF to Ennev on Mon Oct 30 20:57:17 2017
    Re: Re: Intro to pc:: question on editing
    By: Ennev to MRO on Mon Oct 30 2017 06:41 pm

    SlyEdit [ICE] is the best.

    yeah it's like iceedit/quikedit in appearance.

    You convinced me. IÆll give it a try. IÆll see if I can install it in the morning.



    i uploaded quikedit to vert.
    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ ::: BBSES.info - free BBS services :::
  • From Dumas Walker@VERT/CAPCITY2/CAPCITY3 to JON JUSTVIG on Mon Oct 30 18:02:00 2017
    Sometime in the future, we will look back and think 10MBps is a fast speed when
    10GBps comes around. What is the future insight anyway. I have wondered if >internet or telecommunications of some sort will be linked to a power outlet >instead of a 2wire land line or a cat/ethernet cable. All we really need is >the 0s and 1s anyway.

    I assume at some point in the future, it will all be telepathic. :)

    ---
    ■ SLMR 2.1a ■ "Number eight <BURP>...Number Eight <BURP>..."
    ■ Synchronet ■ CAPCITY3 Test System
  • From spacesst@VERT/SPACESST to Ennev on Mon Oct 30 20:08:10 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Ennev to Denn on Mon Oct 30 2017 07:37:43



    I think the big problem would be line noise, years ago I tried the
    power line wifi and the packet loss was horrible.

    I don't know if it was the case, but I know some countries in Europe like France and here in Canada there as been some pilot project. At the end here i think that i was hard to offer bandwidth that would have competed with what was offered with dsl and cable modem. Power being state owned in my province it gives us low prices (.0582$/kWh) but I don't think it's a great bed for innovation, I know they do research but not in communication i guess.

    Bestbuy have powerline , Homeplug and other name device using electricity
    outlet , it work great but only on same circuit , if pass thru
    Electric/breaker BOX , Does not Work well

    ... It's innocence when it charms us, ignorance when it doesn't.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ SpaceSST BBS - Your Gateway for Usenet
  • From spacesst@VERT/SPACESST to Bigbangnet on Mon Oct 30 20:12:39 2017
    Re: Re: Intro to pc:: question on editing
    By: Bigbangnet to Ennev on Mon Oct 30 2017 12:17:15

    Re: Re: Intro to pc:: question on editing
    By: Ennev to Bigbangnet on Wed Oct 25 2017 07:15:48



    How do you properly edit text here. I mean, I've seen some people
    cut tex and insert text between it. I've tried to look at the
    shortcuts but ...id I'm not looking at it properly

    I cheat, most of the time I reply by using the webservice at :
    http://mtlgeek.synchro.net:8080/ on my board or a use a news reader
    like thunderbird using port 119.
    using thunderbird...how would I configure that ? just type in the address of mtlgeek.synchronet:8080 and such ? tahts it ?

    just type mtlgeek.synchronet for NNTP/usenet no port

    ... One fifth of the people are against everything all the time.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ SpaceSST BBS - Your Gateway for Usenet
  • From Ennev@VERT/MTLGEEK to Derision on Tue Oct 31 07:07:35 2017
    It took me a while to get assembly, but once I did, it was like a switch flipped. It seemed so simple, compared to other stuff I was learning (or trying to learn) at the time. Mostly just pushing bits from one memory location to another (on the C64, anyway).

    Things with assembler is that there is not ambiguity, you know exactly what a command will do and what it's scope is. Now always that clean cut with interpreted language and even compiled language.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ MtlGeek - Geeks in Montreal - http://mtlgeek.com/ -
  • From Ennev@VERT/MTLGEEK to spacesst on Tue Oct 31 10:59:53 2017


    Bestbuy have powerline , Homeplug and other name device using
    electricity
    outlet , it work great but only on same circuit , if pass thru
    Electric/breaker BOX , Does not Work well

    Yes I have friends who use this to extend theirs network at home, it's an elegant solution and can be quite fast.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ MtlGeek - Geeks in Montreal - http://mtlgeek.com/ -
  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Nightfox on Tue Oct 31 09:18:24 2017
    Re: Win 95
    By: Nightfox to poindexter FORTRAN on Mon Oct 30 2017 01:16 pm

    I think that implies that OS/2 was a bit more efficient though, at least for multi-tasking DOS applications. I actually had the impression that OS/2 was superior to Windows overall. I've more recently read articles talking about OS/2's GUI task queue being inefficient which could freeze the GUI, but I read that was fixed in (I believe) OS/2 Warp 4.0.

    I started using OS/2 in 1991 in an all-IBM shop. We had PS/2 desktops and servers on a Token Ring network and AS/400 and S/38 midrange computers running over a Twinax network.

    Back when DOS could do one thing at a time, we were running OS/2 1.3 with a graphical interface, and I could call BBSes with a comm app, run Word and Excel natively, and connect to both networks - one running a terminal program, and copying files to/from the MS Lan Manager network - on a 386/25 with 8 megs of RAM.

    I used OS/2 in 1993/1994 to run console apps; I managed a Netware network at the time. You could create a VM with a specific version of DOS, create a VM with DOS drivers if there wasn't an OS/2 version, and multitask DOS - I remember dialing 2 BBSes and not dropping any packets at 38400.

    OS/2 console apps were great - I ran native versions of BinkleyTerm, Maximus, Squish, TimED and Qedit on OS/2 and they ran well. GUI apps fell behind, and IBM's answer was to make Windows apps work in OS/2. Microsoft wasn't playing well, though, and I remember it being a pain.

    What ended my time with OS/2 was trying to get TCP/IP working when I already ran Netware - I ended up cheating and putting a second network card in my system at work! At that point, the first Pentiums came out and a Pentium had enough horsepower to let Windows multitask a DOS app well enough.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ realitycheckBBS -- http://realitycheckBBS.org
  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Dumas Walker on Tue Oct 31 09:22:13 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Dumas Walker to JON JUSTVIG on Mon Oct 30 2017 06:02 pm

    I assume at some point in the future, it will all be telepathic. :)

    There's going to be a lost generation - kids nowadays are going to grow up hunched over from looking at their phones. In 10 years or so, they'll have neural matrix implants and kids will walk upright again.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ realitycheckBBS -- http://realitycheckBBS.org
  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Ennev on Tue Oct 31 09:23:48 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Ennev to spacesst on Tue Oct 31 2017 10:59 am

    Yes I have friends who use this to extend theirs network at home, it's an elegant solution and can be quite fast.

    I've used them for some time. I can get 40 mbps on connections on the same floor and 20 mbps crossing circuits to another floor. Once every couple of weeks they need to be power cycled, but they're a cheap, easy solution for networking.

    I tried using WDS to connect my routers wirelessly to create a mesh network, it became easier to plug in a powerline adapter and plug a wireles AP into it.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ realitycheckBBS -- http://realitycheckBBS.org
  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to Vk3jed on Tue Oct 31 09:51:21 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Vk3jed to Ennev on Tue Oct 31 2017 11:12 am

    As for Internet access over power lines, not a great idea. Putting high frequency signals onto open lines is called a radio transmitter, and you're going to cause huge interference to HF radio communication - not just hams, but long haul aircraft and other services. And you will suffer interference from legitimate transmitters as well.

    Powerline ethernet adapters use your home's power circuit to transmit network data. As far as I know, they don't transmit anything over radio waves..

    Nightfox

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Digital Distortion: digitaldistortionbbs.com
  • From Nelgin@VERT/EOTLBBS to poindexter FORTRAN on Tue Oct 31 12:16:45 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to computers
    By: poindexter FORTRAN to Nelgin on Mon Oct 30 2017 09:54 am

    And WinQVT and WinVN. And Eudora Light.

    I was more of a Pegasus person.

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ End Of The Line BBS - endofthelinebbs.com
  • From echicken@VERT/ECBBS to Nightfox on Tue Oct 31 13:49:28 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Nightfox to Vk3jed on Tue Oct 31 2017 09:51:21

    Powerline ethernet adapters use your home's power circuit to transmit network data. As far as I know, they don't transmit anything over radio waves..

    The radio waves happen sort of incidentally / as a byproduct. These devices transmit a changing electrical signal or a particular frequency into unshielded wiring. The wiring, not originally designed to suppress RF radiation, ends up serving as a poor antenna. It's a problem with commercial efforts to provide broadband internet access over powerlines; I'm not sure how much of an issue it is with consumer level devices that use household wiring.

    ---
    echicken
    electronic chicken bbs - bbs.electronicchicken.com - 416-273-7230
    ■ Synchronet ■ electronic chicken bbs - bbs.electronicchicken.com
  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to poindexter FORTRAN on Tue Oct 31 12:48:18 2017
    Re: Win 95
    By: poindexter FORTRAN to Nightfox on Tue Oct 31 2017 09:18 am

    Back when DOS could do one thing at a time, we were running OS/2 1.3 with a graphical interface, and I could call BBSes with a comm app, run Word and Excel natively, and connect to both networks - one running a terminal program, and copying files to/from the MS Lan Manager network - on a 386/25 with 8 megs of RAM.

    I used OS/2 in 1993/1994 to run console apps; I managed a Netware network at the time. You could create a VM with a specific version of DOS, create a VM with DOS drivers if there wasn't an OS/2 version, and multitask DOS - I remember dialing 2 BBSes and not dropping any packets at 38400.

    I think that's pretty impressive for an OS back then.

    What ended my time with OS/2 was trying to get TCP/IP working when I already ran Netware - I ended up cheating and putting a second network card in my system at work!

    Speaking of TCP/IP, I was using OS/2 in a VM a few years ago, and I was surprised to see that OS/2 required you to reboot your system to change its IP address. I don't remember having to do that back in the day, but then I was mainly using dialup networking in the 90s to connect to the internet and didn't have ethernet going at home.

    Nightfox

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Digital Distortion: digitaldistortionbbs.com
  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to poindexter FORTRAN on Tue Oct 31 12:49:49 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: poindexter FORTRAN to Dumas Walker on Tue Oct 31 2017 09:22 am

    There's going to be a lost generation - kids nowadays are going to grow up hunched over from looking at their phones. In 10 years or so, they'll have neural matrix implants and kids will walk upright again.

    If things keep going like that, it seems we may become like the Borg some day..

    Nightfox

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Digital Distortion: digitaldistortionbbs.com
  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to poindexter FORTRAN on Tue Oct 31 12:52:59 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: poindexter FORTRAN to Ennev on Tue Oct 31 2017 09:23 am

    Yes I have friends who use this to extend theirs network at home,
    it's an elegant solution and can be quite fast.

    I've used them for some time. I can get 40 mbps on connections on the same floor and 20 mbps crossing circuits to another floor. Once every couple of weeks they need to be power cycled, but they're a cheap, easy solution for networking.

    I started using powerline ethernet adapters a couple years ago. It seems to also depend also on the brand & model you're using. Currently I'm using a pair of Extollo LANSocket 1500 adapters, which were the fastest I saw on the market a couple years ago. I'm using one downstairs and one upstairs, and I'm not sure if they're crossing circuits or not, but after I bought them I did a speed test and saw speeds of up to 140 mbps with them. I'm not sure I feel like wiring my house for ethernet, and at this point I've actually found wi-fi more reliable than the powerline ethernet adapters. The powerline ethernet adapters do work well much of the time, but they drop their connection sometimes.

    Nightfox

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Digital Distortion: digitaldistortionbbs.com
  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to echicken on Tue Oct 31 12:54:59 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: echicken to Nightfox on Tue Oct 31 2017 01:49 pm

    Powerline ethernet adapters use your home's power circuit to
    transmit network data. As far as I know, they don't transmit
    anything over radio waves..

    The radio waves happen sort of incidentally / as a byproduct. These devices transmit a changing electrical signal or a particular frequency into unshielded wiring. The wiring, not originally designed to suppress RF radiation, ends up serving as a poor antenna. It's a problem with commercial efforts to provide broadband internet access over powerlines; I'm not sure how much of an issue it is with consumer level devices that use household wiring.

    Interesting.. I hadn't heard about broadband internet access that way, although I've heard of Comcast using their customers' wifi access points to provide public access points for Comcast customers. And every so often I see a Comcast access point when I'm out somewhere. I don't use Comcast anymore, but when I did, I found I could log into those Comcast access points with my Comcast user ID & password and use it for wi-fi internet access.

    Nightfox

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Digital Distortion: digitaldistortionbbs.com
  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Derision on Wed Nov 1 07:19:00 2017
    Derision wrote to Vk3jed <=-

    It took me a while to get assembly, but once I did, it was like a
    switch flipped. It seemed so simple, compared to other stuff I was learning (or trying to learn) at the time. Mostly just pushing bits
    from one memory location to another (on the C64, anyway).

    I got it pretty much straight away, the hard part was relating all those low level instructions to the higher level goals of making the computer do something you wanted it to do. :) Sort of a can't see the forest for the trees scenario.


    ... I used to be an agnostic, but now I'm not so sure.
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.49
    ■ Synchronet ■ Freeway BBS in Bendigo, Australia.
  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Nightfox on Wed Nov 1 07:26:00 2017
    Nightfox wrote to Vk3jed <=-

    Powerline ethernet adapters use your home's power circuit to transmit network data. As far as I know, they don't transmit anything over
    radio waves..

    But guess what happens when you put high frequencies through an unshielded wire? Oh, that looks a bit like an antenna! :) While the conductors are in parallel, which will cancel out most of the radiation, powerlines are poorly balanced, so some radiation will escape. Not as big an issue with the domestic in house adapters, where run lengths are short and the power used is lower, but a huge issue for the so-called broadband over powerline systems that were being touted a decade ago. I think (fortunately), FTTP is rendering these obsolete.

    Mind you, DSL (in its various guises) have similar issues, though at least here, the line is a bit better balanced, and injected power is probably lower (lower noise floor for starters!). Fibre is the clear winner.... again!


    ... Chain Lightning: For when you can't stop with one bolt.
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.49
    ■ Synchronet ■ Freeway BBS in Bendigo, Australia.
  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Ennev on Wed Nov 1 07:47:00 2017
    Ennev wrote to spacesst <=-

    Yes I have friends who use this to extend theirs network at home, it's
    an elegant solution and can be quite fast.

    In the previous house, they worked well, but here, the two halves of the network are on different power circuits, and I was only getting about 3Mbps using the powerline adapters. Bit the bullet and ran a Cat 5 cable straight theough the middle of the house and haven't looked back. :-)


    ... Average is as close to the bottom as it is to the top.
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.49
    ■ Synchronet ■ Freeway BBS in Bendigo, Australia.
  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to echicken on Wed Nov 1 08:09:00 2017
    echicken wrote to Nightfox <=-

    The radio waves happen sort of incidentally / as a byproduct. These devices transmit a changing electrical signal or a particular frequency into unshielded wiring. The wiring, not originally designed to suppress
    RF radiation, ends up serving as a poor antenna. It's a problem with commercial efforts to provide broadband internet access over
    powerlines; I'm not sure how much of an issue it is with consumer level devices that use household wiring.

    In my experience, no huge problems. I think most of home powerline networking products notch out the ham frequencies, which are the most likely to be problematic in a domestic environment. Might be more of a problem for those into general shortwave monitoring.

    I did find another issue with powerline Ethernet. A friend brought a laptop over, and its power supply took out the powerline network, every time it was plugged in, so there are a small number of devices that can disrupt the
    etwork.


    ... Was Jimi Hendrix's modem a Purple Hayes?
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.49
    ■ Synchronet ■ Freeway BBS in Bendigo, Australia.
  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Nightfox on Wed Nov 1 08:20:00 2017
    Nightfox wrote to poindexter FORTRAN <=-

    Speaking of TCP/IP, I was using OS/2 in a VM a few years ago, and I was surprised to see that OS/2 required you to reboot your system to change its IP address. I don't remember having to do that back in the day,
    but then I was mainly using dialup networking in the 90s to connect to
    the internet and didn't have ethernet going at home.

    I can't recall. I did have a LAN running IP, but my IP addressing remained static for many years. I've only had two major changes in my IP addressing. The first was around 2001, when my original LAN consisting of public IP addresses had to be changed to private IPs when I switched from dialup (with a /29) to cable. The second was in 2008, caused by merging two networks into one. I worked out which was going to be the easiest way to renumber my network, the gear that was already in place ended up being renumbered. The current numbering scheme started in 2005-2006, before we moved in together.


    ... Since bread is square, then why is sandwich meat round?
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.49
    ■ Synchronet ■ Freeway BBS in Bendigo, Australia.
  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Nightfox on Wed Nov 1 08:20:00 2017
    Nightfox wrote to poindexter FORTRAN <=-

    If things keep going like that, it seems we may become like the Borg
    some day..

    You will be assimilated. ;)


    ... It's not the money I want, it's the stuff.
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.49
    ■ Synchronet ■ Freeway BBS in Bendigo, Australia.
  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Nightfox on Wed Nov 1 08:25:00 2017
    Nightfox wrote to poindexter FORTRAN <=-

    I started using powerline ethernet adapters a couple years ago. It
    seems to also depend also on the brand & model you're using. Currently

    I first used them 7 years ago - a couple of Netcomm adapters, which were pretty reliable, providing the outlets were on the same circuit. They were rated at 85 Mbps, which they achieved on the same circuit. Otherwise it was about 3Mbps, but still reliable.

    I'm using a pair of Extollo LANSocket 1500 adapters, which were the fastest I saw on the market a couple years ago. I'm using one
    downstairs and one upstairs, and I'm not sure if they're crossing
    circuits or not, but after I bought them I did a speed test and saw
    speeds of up to 140 mbps with them. I'm not sure I feel like wiring my house for ethernet, and at this point I've actually found wi-fi more reliable than the powerline ethernet adapters. The powerline ethernet adapters do work well much of the time, but they drop their connection sometimes.

    I've had mixed results using wifi for internal bridging, but good reults outdoors. I also prefer to keep wifi for devices that actually need it (i.e. mobile/portable - laptops, phones, tablets, etc), and have all fixed machines wired in.


    ... Join Taglines Anonymous. We can help.
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.49
    ■ Synchronet ■ Freeway BBS in Bendigo, Australia.
  • From Vk3jed@VERT/FREEWAY to Nightfox on Wed Nov 1 08:27:00 2017
    Nightfox wrote to echicken <=-

    Interesting.. I hadn't heard about broadband internet access that way, although I've heard of Comcast using their customers' wifi access
    points to provide public access points for Comcast customers. And
    every so often I see a Comcast access point when I'm out somewhere. I don't use Comcast anymore, but when I did, I found I could log into
    those Comcast access points with my Comcast user ID & password and use
    it for wi-fi internet access.

    Telstra, our largest provider also have a similar scheme for wifi hotspots. I supposedly have free access to those hotspots, as I have prepaid 4G broadband with them, which I use for instant Internet when I need it out in the field.


    ... COMMAND: A suggestion made to a computer.
    --- MultiMail/Win32 v0.49
    ■ Synchronet ■ Freeway BBS in Bendigo, Australia.
  • From MRO@VERT/BBSESINF to Ennev on Tue Oct 31 17:13:40 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Ennev to spacesst on Tue Oct 31 2017 10:59 am



    Bestbuy have powerline , Homeplug and other name device using electricity
    outlet , it work great but only on same circuit , if pass thru
    Electric/breaker BOX , Does not Work well

    Yes I have friends who use this to extend theirs network at home, it's an elegant solution and can be quite fast.


    whats better is drilling a hole in the floor and running wire.
    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ ::: BBSES.info - free BBS services :::
  • From MRO@VERT/BBSESINF to Nightfox on Tue Oct 31 17:19:30 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Nightfox to echicken on Tue Oct 31 2017 12:54 pm

    Interesting.. I hadn't heard about broadband internet access that way, although I've heard of Comcast using their customers' wifi access points to provide public access points for Comcast customers. And every so often I see a Comcast access point when I'm out somewhere. I don't use Comcast anymore, but when I did, I found I could log into those Comcast access


    charter/spectrum/twc does that also
    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ ::: BBSES.info - free BBS services :::
  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to Vk3jed on Tue Oct 31 16:08:55 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Vk3jed to Nightfox on Wed Nov 01 2017 08:25 am

    I've had mixed results using wifi for internal bridging, but good reults outdoors. I also prefer to keep wifi for devices that actually need it (i.e. mobile/portable - laptops, phones, tablets, etc), and have all fixed machines wired in.

    Normally I'd prefer to have fixed PCs wired too, but it seems sometimes wired networking (with powerline ethernet adapters, etc.) might be less reliable than wifi.

    Nightfox

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Digital Distortion: digitaldistortionbbs.com
  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to MRO on Tue Oct 31 16:19:57 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: MRO to Ennev on Tue Oct 31 2017 05:13 pm

    Yes I have friends who use this to extend theirs network at home, it's
    an elegant solution and can be quite fast.

    whats better is drilling a hole in the floor and running wire.

    If you simply drill holes and run wire through them, I wonder if that would cause problems with moisture getting inside the drywall from humidity over time. I suppose there's the same issue with electrical outlets & coax outlets etc., but I'd think there must be a way to help prevent moisture/humidity buildup and mold inside the drywall..

    Nightfox

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Digital Distortion: digitaldistortionbbs.com
  • From Ed Vance@VERT/CAPCITY2 to poindexter FORTRAN on Tue Oct 31 21:36:00 2017
    10-31-17 09:22 poindexter FORTRAN wrote to Dumas Walker about Re: Introduction to compu
    Howdy, Pointdexter Fortran,

    @VIA: VERT/REALITY
    @MSGID: <59F8A335.20817.dove.dove-gen@realitycheckbbs.org>
    @REPLY: <59F7A522.348.dove-general@mybbs.com>
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Dumas Walker to JON JUSTVIG on Mon Oct 30 2017 06:02 pm

    I assume at some point in the future, it will all be telepathic. :)

    There's going to be a lost generation - kids nowadays are going to grow
    up hunched over from looking at their phones. In 10 years or so,
    they'll have neural matrix implants and kids will walk upright again.

    I would had thought the large backpacks the kids wear would prevent
    them from getting hunch backs, and keep them upright when they tried
    to bend over to use their smartphones.

    I'm from a earlier generation where kids carried a heavy binder under
    one arm.
    Glad I never had to wear a backpack.

    I never had to wear a backpack even during my time in the Military,
    I was in the Navy.

    I feel sorry for the Little and Big Kids who have to wear a backpack.

    ... Have you checked your smoke detector batteries & Fire Ext, LATELY?!
    --- MultiMail/MS-DOS v0.49
    ■ Synchronet ■ CAPCITY2 * capcity2.synchro.net * 1-502-875-8938
  • From MRO@VERT/BBSESINF to Nightfox on Tue Oct 31 22:26:31 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Nightfox to Vk3jed on Tue Oct 31 2017 04:08 pm

    I've had mixed results using wifi for internal bridging, but good reults outdoors. I also prefer to keep wifi for devices that actually need it (i.e. mobile/portable - laptops, phones, tablets, etc), and have all fixed machines wired in.

    Normally I'd prefer to have fixed PCs wired too, but it seems sometimes wired networking (with powerline ethernet adapters, etc.) might be less reliable than wifi.


    well i dont know if you can throw in powerline ethernet adapters into the category of wired networking. just plain ethernet works great.
    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ ::: BBSES.info - free BBS services :::
  • From MRO@VERT/BBSESINF to Nightfox on Tue Oct 31 22:28:20 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Nightfox to MRO on Tue Oct 31 2017 04:19 pm

    If you simply drill holes and run wire through them, I wonder if that would cause problems with moisture getting inside the drywall from humidity over time. I suppose there's the same issue with electrical outlets & coax outlets etc., but I'd think there must be a way to help prevent moisture/humidity buildup and mold inside the drywall..


    i go right up through the floor on one side of the house and i keep it as close to the wall as possible. if you have humidity problems you probably need a better roof with vents and maybe run a dehumidifier in problem areas of the house.
    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ ::: BBSES.info - free BBS services :::
  • From Jagossel@VERT/MTLGEEK to Ed Vance on Wed Nov 1 06:58:14 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Ed Vance to poindexter FORTRAN on Tue Oct 31 2017 21:36:00

    I feel sorry for the Little and Big Kids who have to wear a backpack.

    I was one of those kids in middle and high school that had the large and heavy backpacks. The problem is that the schools have teachers that all would assign homework everyday and only allow a few minutes to go from one side of the school to another on a large campus, often in crowded hallways, leaving no to little time to stop by a locker.

    It seems like kids these days have computers instead of books, now...

    Huh, didn't think I would have told one of those "I had to walk 5 miles to school in the snow..." type of stories. Those young whipper-snapoers and their new fangled adding machines... <g>

    -jag
    Code it, Script it, Automate it!


    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ MtlGeek - Geeks in Montreal - http://mtlgeek.com/ -
  • From Denn@VERT/OUTWEST to Nightfox on Wed Nov 1 09:22:34 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Nightfox to echicken on Tue Oct 31 2017 12:54 pm

    Interesting.. I hadn't heard about broadband internet access that way, although I've heard of Comcast using their customers' wifi access points to provide public access points for Comcast customers. And every so often I see a Comcast access point when I'm out somewhere. I don't use Comcast anymore, but when I did, I found I could log into those Comcast access points with my Comcast user ID & password and use it for wi-fi internet access.

    I went into the firmware and blocked the comcast / xfinity so they can't use my bandwidth, I do however use the xfinity WiFi sometimes when I'm out and about, I might re enable xfinity's use of my modem router for a hot spot because it uses very little of my 250 gb bandwidth.

    "... The only thing shorter than a weekend is a vacation."

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ the Outwest BBS - outwestbbs.com Telnet - outwestbbs.com:23
  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to MRO on Wed Nov 1 09:45:01 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: MRO to Nightfox on Tue Oct 31 2017 10:26 pm

    well i dont know if you can throw in powerline ethernet adapters into the category of wired networking. just plain ethernet works great.

    Powerline ethernet adapters aren't wireless.. Not sure what they would be other than wired.

    Nightfox

    ---
    ■ Synchronet ■ Digital Distortion: digitaldistortionbbs.com
  • From MRO@VERT/BBSESINF to Jagossel on Wed Nov 1 17:31:56 2017
    Re: Backpacks in School
    By: Jagossel to Ed Vance on Wed Nov 01 2017 06:58 am

    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Ed Vance to poindexter FORTRAN on Tue Oct 31 2017 21:36:00

    I feel sorry for the Little and Big Kids who have to wear a backpack.

    I was one of those kids in middle and high school that had the large and heavy backpacks. The problem is that the schools have teachers that all would assign homework everyday and only allow a few minutes to go from one side of the school to another on a large campus, often in crowded hallways,


    now there's no homework. and common core math.
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  • From thumper@VERT/THEWASTE to Nightfox on Wed Nov 1 10:57:00 2017
    Nightfox wrote to poindexter FORTRAN <=-

    @VIA: VERT
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    @TZ: 41e0
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: poindexter FORTRAN to Dumas Walker on Tue Oct 31 2017 09:22 am

    There's going to be a lost generation - kids nowadays are going to grow up hunched over from looking at their phones. In 10 years or so, they'll have neural matrix implants and kids will walk upright again.

    If things keep going like that, it seems we may become like the Borg
    some day..

    I think my Grandaughter's phone is already grown to her head now! ;)


    ... MultiMail, the new multi-platform, multi-format offline reader!
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  • From Muhammad Al-Khwarizmi@VERT/AMIGAC to Derision on Fri Nov 3 02:24:42 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to computers
    By: Derision to Ennev on Tue Oct 24 2017 04:53:19

    Re: Re: Introduction to computers
    By: Ennev to Muhammad Al-Khwarizmi on Mon Oct 23 2017 09:12:49

    Oh yes, that's the thing. The vast majority of games where taking over, they only way out was reboot. They would totally take over the entire system, the os was multi-tasking but forget it when I game was running. From this aspect it was acting much more like a game machine.

    One of the things that I've had some trouble getting used to is the idea of booting software off floppies again. On the C64, it's a no-brainer. You're either using a physical disk or a .D64 as a virtual disk and running off that. But my brain has been so conditioned by Macs and Windows that I *WANT* everything to run within Workbench, and that just isn't how it is. There's plenty of stuff that doesn't even need (or want) the OS to run.

    Use WHDLoad?

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  • From Derision@VERT/AMIGAC to Muhammad Al-Khwarizmi on Sun Nov 5 03:34:48 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to computers
    By: Muhammad Al-Khwarizmi to Derision on Fri Nov 03 2017 02:24:42

    One of the things that I've had some trouble getting used to is the idea of booting software off floppies again. On the C64, it's a no-brainer. You're either using a physical disk or a .D64 as a virtual disk and running off that. But my brain has been so conditioned by Macs and Windows that I *WANT* everything to run within Workbench, and that just isn't how it is. There's plenty of stuff that doesn't even need (or want) the OS to run.

    Use WHDLoad?

    That is a thing that you can do. I mucked about with it for a bit, but I'm not quite Amiga-savvy enough at this point, so like half the stuff doesn't work. Besides... I got disks, and I got a drive (a couple, actually), so I figure I'll progress through learning the thing the way I would've had I gotten one when they were new.

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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Nightfox on Sun Nov 5 08:41:00 2017
    Nightfox wrote to Vk3jed <=-

    Powerline ethernet adapters use your home's power circuit to transmit network data. As far as I know, they don't transmit anything over
    radio waves..

    They supposedly mess with amateur radio - I know my shortwaves are a
    mess of static in the new house with powerline running a few feet
    away.

    I have a neighbor with a huge directional antenna on his roof and a
    couple of whip antennas - I should ask him what he experiences.

    ... Have you ever asked a question you weren't supposed to ask?
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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Nightfox on Sun Nov 5 09:16:00 2017
    Nightfox wrote to poindexter FORTRAN <=-

    Speaking of TCP/IP, I was using OS/2 in a VM a few years ago, and I was surprised to see that OS/2 required you to reboot your system to change its IP address. I don't remember having to do that back in the day,
    but then I was mainly using dialup networking in the 90s to connect to
    the internet and didn't have ethernet going at home.



    That was about the time that I started using NT Server 3.51; it looked
    just like Windows 3.11, but I had the eerie feeling that it was going
    to be the start of something big.



    ... So, this is me. Who am I?
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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Vk3jed on Sun Nov 5 09:18:00 2017
    Vk3jed wrote to echicken <=-

    laptop over, and its power supply took out the powerline network, every time it was plugged in, so there are a small number of devices that can disrupt the etwork.

    LED christmas lights play havoc on my throughput here.



    ... So, this is me. Who am I?
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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Vk3jed on Sun Nov 5 09:19:00 2017
    Vk3jed wrote to Nightfox <=-

    I can't recall. I did have a LAN running IP, but my IP addressing remained static for many years.

    Things were simpler. We allocated static public IPs to all of our
    systems - no need for DHCP. :)





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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Vk3jed on Sun Nov 5 09:19:00 2017
    Vk3jed wrote to Nightfox <=-

    If things keep going like that, it seems we may become like the Borg
    some day..

    You will be assimilated. ;)

    They already have been assimilated. They just haven't realized it yet.



    ... Cut a vital connection
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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Jagossel on Sun Nov 5 09:24:00 2017
    Jagossel wrote to Ed Vance <=-

    I was one of those kids in middle and high school that had the large
    and heavy backpacks. The problem is that the schools have teachers that all would assign homework everyday and only allow a few minutes to go
    from one side of the school to another on a large campus, often in
    crowded hallways, leaving no to little time to stop by a locker.


    I'm glad the locker pendulum has swung back - schools decided to
    remove lockers as a gut reaction to weapon or drug concerns. That's
    when I started seeing 50 pound kids with 40 pound backpacks. The
    outcry was so big that schools recanted.

    My son's high school has an afterschool study program in the library
    with all of the books available for checkout, classroom books
    available during class and his teachers offer to send books home so
    they don't need to lug them around.

    They use a system called SchoolLoop where his grades get posted in
    real time, there's an email system for contacting teachers, and the
    more savvy teachers have PDFs of assignments available to download.

    I tried to get my son to think about using a photo scan app on his
    phone to make PDFs of his assignments, then email them to his kindle. Paperless, backed up, and lighter than lugging a backpack full of
    papers.





    ... Take away the elements in order of apparent non-importance
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  • From MRO@VERT/BBSESINF to poindexter FORTRAN on Sun Nov 5 13:10:21 2017
    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: poindexter FORTRAN to Vk3jed on Sun Nov 05 2017 09:18 am

    Vk3jed wrote to echicken <=-

    laptop over, and its power supply took out the powerline network, every time it was plugged in, so there are a small number of devices that can disrupt the etwork.

    LED christmas lights play havoc on my throughput here.




    what do they play havoc with? they really shouldnt disrupt anything.
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  • From Ed Vance@VERT/CAPCITY2 to Jagossel on Sun Nov 5 17:25:00 2017
    11-01-17 06:58 Jagossel wrote to Ed Vance about Backpacks in School
    Howdy! jag,

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    Re: Re: Introduction to compu
    By: Ed Vance to poindexter FORTRAN on Tue Oct 31 2017 21:36:00

    I feel sorry for the Little and Big Kids who have to wear a backpack.

    I was one of those kids in middle and high school that had the large
    and heavy backpacks. The problem is that the schools have teachers that all would assign homework everyday and only allow a few minutes to go
    from one side of the school to another on a large campus, often in
    crowded hallways, leaving no to little time to stop by a locker.

    It seems like kids these days have computers instead of books, now...

    Huh, didn't think I would have told one of those "I had to walk 5 miles
    to school in the snow..." type of stories. Those young whipper-snapoers and their new fangled adding machines... <g>

    After writing my message about backpacks I remembered I also carried a
    Gym bag to and from home, besides carrying the Zippered Notebook.

    Ah the good old days............


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  • From Nightfox@VERT/DIGDIST to poindexter FORTRAN on Sun Nov 5 18:29:25 2017
    Re: Re: Win 95
    By: poindexter FORTRAN to Nightfox on Sun Nov 05 2017 08:16 am

    Speaking of TCP/IP, I was using OS/2 in a VM a few years ago, and I
    was surprised to see that OS/2 required you to reboot your system to
    change its IP address. I don't remember having to do that back in
    the day, but then I was mainly using dialup networking in the 90s to
    connect to the internet and didn't have ethernet going at home.

    That was about the time that I started using NT Server 3.51; it looked just like Windows 3.11, but I had the eerie feeling that it was going
    to be the start of something big.

    I've read that Windows NT was based on OS/2 (Microsoft was working with IBM on OS/2, and I heard Microsoft was able to take a version of the OS/2 source code when they split). I've seen screenshots of early versions of OS/2's Presentation Manager, and it looked a lot like Windows 3.x..

    Nightfox

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  • From poindexter FORTRAN@VERT/REALITY to Nightfox on Tue Nov 7 17:13:47 2017
    Re: Re: Win 95
    By: Nightfox to poindexter FORTRAN on Sun Nov 05 2017 06:29 pm

    I've read that Windows NT was based on OS/2 (Microsoft was working with IBM on OS/2, and I heard Microsoft was able to take a version of the OS/2 source code when they split). I've seen screenshots of early versions of OS/2's Presentation Manager, and it looked a lot like Windows 3.x..

    OS/2 1.x did look a lot like Windows at that point, and Microsoft and IBM actively worked together on them. Having Microsoft Office apps for OS/2 was the irony.

    I don't think it was until 2.0 that they came out with the Workplace shell and it got much different. Lots of context-based object oriented stuff that Windows never came close to.

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